2011
DOI: 10.1002/j.2050-0416.2011.tb00496.x
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125th Anniversary Review: The Non-Biological Instability of Beer

Abstract: Unlike many alcoholic beverages beer is inherently unstable. In chemical (as opposed to microbiological) terms this instability can be considered -and is here reviewed -in the categories of colloidal instability, foam, gushing, flavour instability and light sensitivity

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Cited by 48 publications
(52 citation statements)
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“…This was because there were high levels of SO 2 produced during fermentation in beer pitched with a lower rate and it acted as an antioxidant. SO 2 has three main roles in beer, firstly it reacts with carbonyl compounds to form alpha-hydroxysulphonates and these are not flavour active and thus increase the threshold of carbonyl compounds responsible for the stale flavour (Bamforth, 2011). Also sulphur dioxide inhibits oxidative reactions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…This was because there were high levels of SO 2 produced during fermentation in beer pitched with a lower rate and it acted as an antioxidant. SO 2 has three main roles in beer, firstly it reacts with carbonyl compounds to form alpha-hydroxysulphonates and these are not flavour active and thus increase the threshold of carbonyl compounds responsible for the stale flavour (Bamforth, 2011). Also sulphur dioxide inhibits oxidative reactions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Figure 4 illustrates the flavour wheel of the sample with pitching rate of 0.7kg/hl which has flavour defects such as papery which is due to the oxidation. According to Bamforth [4] it can be said that all beers are susceptible to flavour degradation due to aging. Thus flavour active compounds such as furfural, trans-2-nonenal, acetaldehyde and other oxidative products of normal beer flavour constituents are responsible for contributing cardboard, papery or strawberry like off flavours to beer.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Over 200 carbonyl compounds are reported to contribute to the flavour of fresh beer and other alcoholic beverages [1,6]. These compounds influence beer flavour and are produced as a result of yeast metabolism during fermentation.…”
Section: Carbonylsmentioning
confidence: 99%