Editorial Board 2005
DOI: 10.1002/9781119750802.ch8
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Yield Alternation: Horticulture, Physiology, Molecular Biology, and Evolution

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Cited by 10 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…Gibberellins (GAs) are a type of endogenous hormone found in plants that regulate the development of the plant's vegetative and reproductive systems [207]. When controlling stem elongation, the effects of gibberellins (GAs) processes on cell growth and division are critical [208]. Compared to the shoot, Gibberellin insufficiency promotes the partitioning of reserves to the root [209].…”
Section: Gibberellinsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Gibberellins (GAs) are a type of endogenous hormone found in plants that regulate the development of the plant's vegetative and reproductive systems [207]. When controlling stem elongation, the effects of gibberellins (GAs) processes on cell growth and division are critical [208]. Compared to the shoot, Gibberellin insufficiency promotes the partitioning of reserves to the root [209].…”
Section: Gibberellinsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This phenomenon seems to be more accentuated by water stress on certain cultivars such as 'Timhdit' and ‘Obil-42’ compared to others such as ‘Fortu-43’, ‘Black-S46’ and ‘Red-B38’. It is mainly attributed to competition for assimilates during floral induction and fruit growth, which becomes more intense under water stress conditions ( Goldschmidt and Sadka, 2021 ). However, it should be noted that monitoring the behavior of cultivars under water stress for several years is necessary for a more conclusive assessment of water stress effect on yield alternation.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In all these scenarios, the fruit can exert an inhibitory effect on the subsequent flowering period. Most obviously, these inhibitory effects occur at the level of floral induction, with fruit dampening down the number of inflorescences produced the following season, even if the fruit are no longer present, implying the existence of a remarkable ‘fruit memory’ ( Goldschmidt and Sadka, 2021 ). However, fruit presence can also impact on subsequent stages of flowering, flower development, and even bud break ( Verreynne and Lovatt, 2009 ).…”
Section: Next-phase Feedbackmentioning
confidence: 99%