2020
DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.910.39486
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X-ray microcomputed tomography applied to the taxonomic study of rare material: redescriptions of seven of Schirch’s Brazilian species of land planarians (Geoplanidae, Platyhelminthes)

Abstract: In 2016, the type-material of ten of the 15 Brazilian land planarians (Platyhelminthes, Tricladida, Geoplanidae) described by Schirch (1929) was discovered deposited in the Museu Nacional do Rio de Janeiro (MNRJ). Schirch only described the external morphology of these species, all originally placed in the genus Geoplana. By the 1930s and 1950s Geoplana itatiayana, G. plana, and G. rezendei underwent taxonomic revision based on the study of non-type specimens. The remaining 12 species also underwent a taxonomi… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…12, 13). In the field of anatomy, µCT has been demonstrated to be a useful analytical tool applied in a rapidly growing variety of metazoan taxa, such as cnidarians [100], plathelminths [101], nematomorphs [99], nematodes [102], polychaetes [103,104], molluscs [98,105], echinoderms [106,107] as well as arthropods [108][109][110][111][112][113]. Modern, lab-based µCT-scanners deliver high resolution allowing the investigation of tiny specimens with body sizes of free-living crustacean larvae ranging from 75-195 µm in Tantulocarida [114], the smallest arthropods in the world, up to 5 cm in length, e.g., in Stomatopoda [115].…”
Section: Additional Commentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…12, 13). In the field of anatomy, µCT has been demonstrated to be a useful analytical tool applied in a rapidly growing variety of metazoan taxa, such as cnidarians [100], plathelminths [101], nematomorphs [99], nematodes [102], polychaetes [103,104], molluscs [98,105], echinoderms [106,107] as well as arthropods [108][109][110][111][112][113]. Modern, lab-based µCT-scanners deliver high resolution allowing the investigation of tiny specimens with body sizes of free-living crustacean larvae ranging from 75-195 µm in Tantulocarida [114], the smallest arthropods in the world, up to 5 cm in length, e.g., in Stomatopoda [115].…”
Section: Additional Commentsmentioning
confidence: 99%