2010
DOI: 10.1080/09500691003728039
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Abstract: In response to international concerns about scientific literacy and students' waning interest in school science, this study investigated the effects of a science-writing project about the socioscientific issue of biosecurity on the development of students' scientific literacy. Students generated two BioStories each that merged scientific information with the narrative storylines in the project. The study was conducted in two phases. In the exploratory phase, a qualitative case study of a 6 th grade class invol… Show more

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Cited by 39 publications
(38 citation statements)
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References 26 publications
(18 reference statements)
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“…The Year 6 students in the first of these studies wrote a series of short stories that merge scientific and narrative genres (i.e., hybridised scientific narratives) about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. The results from this mixed method, two year study support the argument that writing the sequence of stories enhanced students' familiarity with biosecurity issues, helped them to develop a deeper understanding of related biological concepts, and improved their interest in science (Ritchie et al, 2011). In a later study, the intervention was refined and extended with Year 9 students, who composed their stories with the support of a dedicated website, and uploaded them for peer review.…”
mentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…The Year 6 students in the first of these studies wrote a series of short stories that merge scientific and narrative genres (i.e., hybridised scientific narratives) about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity. The results from this mixed method, two year study support the argument that writing the sequence of stories enhanced students' familiarity with biosecurity issues, helped them to develop a deeper understanding of related biological concepts, and improved their interest in science (Ritchie et al, 2011). In a later study, the intervention was refined and extended with Year 9 students, who composed their stories with the support of a dedicated website, and uploaded them for peer review.…”
mentioning
confidence: 97%
“…In response to calls for teaching and learning strategies that promote the development of scientific literacy, and engage school students in the learning of science (Fensham, 2007;Prain, 2006), previous studies by Ritchie, Tomas and Tones (2011) and Tomas, Ritchie and Tones (submitted) have investigated the effects of a writing-to-learn science project on the development of middle school students' scientific literacy. The Year 6 students in the first of these studies wrote a series of short stories that merge scientific and narrative genres (i.e., hybridised scientific narratives) about the socio-scientific issue of biosecurity.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In our program of research, we have explored the use of BioStories as a diversified writing-to-learn science strategy that centralises the role of communication through particular consideration of content, context, code and representation (Kulgemeyer & Schecker, 2013): students write hybridised scientific narratives (representation) that communicate their conceptual understandings (content) related to the socioscientific issue of biosecurity (context) using clear, everyday language and appropriate vocabulary (code). In a series of multi-method studies conducted with Year 6, Year 9 and Year 12 students, it was reported that writing a sequence of BioStories enhanced students' familiarity with biosecurity issues and helped them to develop a deeper understanding of related biological concepts (Ritchie, Tomas, & Tones, 2010); significantly improved their attitudes toward science and science learning (Tomas, Ritchie, & Tones, 2011), and elicited positive emotional responses in science classes (Tomas & Ritchie, 2012). In this paper, we report on the investigation into students' developing scientific literacy, and in doing so, explore the challenges that we encountered in this context.…”
Section: Writing For Scientific Literacymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Given that this study extended our previous qualitative treatment of students' conceptual understanding of a writing-to-learn science project (see Ritchie, Tomas & Tones, 2010), we were interested in developing a data source that facilitated quantitative analysis of students' BioStories as a way of measuring the efficacy of the intervention. We sought to triangulate these data through qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews that probed students' understanding.…”
Section: Setting and Procedures For Inquirymentioning
confidence: 99%
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