2006
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032006000200027
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Insects are the staple diet of woodpeckers, but some species also habitually feed on fruits. A few woodpecker species are recorded as flower visitors for nectar intake. We report here on the blond-crested woodpecker (Celeus flavescens) taking nectar from flowers of two canopy species, Spirotheca passifloroides (Bombacaceae) and Schwartzia brasiliensis (Marcgraviaceae), in the Atlantic forest of south-eastern Brazil. Spirotheca passifloroides blooms for three months in the austral winter, whereas S. brasiliensi… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3

Citation Types

0
8
0
2

Year Published

2007
2007
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
9

Relationship

2
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 14 publications
(10 citation statements)
references
References 11 publications
(14 reference statements)
0
8
0
2
Order By: Relevance
“…While flower visitation by generalist avian nectarivores was noted in the past (Cruden and Toledo 1977;Toledo 1977), floral adaptation for pollination by these birds has only recently been well documented (Vicentini and Fischer 1999;Mendonca and Anjos 2006;Rocca et al 2006;Schmidt-Lebuhna et al 2007;Botes et al 2008;Johnson and Nicolson 2008;Rocca and Sazima 2008;RodriguezRodriguez and Valido 2008;Symes et al 2008;Brown et al 2009) Studies in the past tended to lump both generalist and specialist passerine nectarivores into a single group that was contrasted with hummingbirds. The fallacy of this hummingbird-passerine dichotomy was pointed out by Johnson and Nicolson (2008) who presented data showing that flowers pollinated by specialist passerines are strongly convergent with those pollinated by hummingbirds, and that the most significant dichotomy in bird pollination systems is between specialist and generalist nectarivores, regardless of their phylogenetic affinity.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While flower visitation by generalist avian nectarivores was noted in the past (Cruden and Toledo 1977;Toledo 1977), floral adaptation for pollination by these birds has only recently been well documented (Vicentini and Fischer 1999;Mendonca and Anjos 2006;Rocca et al 2006;Schmidt-Lebuhna et al 2007;Botes et al 2008;Johnson and Nicolson 2008;Rocca and Sazima 2008;RodriguezRodriguez and Valido 2008;Symes et al 2008;Brown et al 2009) Studies in the past tended to lump both generalist and specialist passerine nectarivores into a single group that was contrasted with hummingbirds. The fallacy of this hummingbird-passerine dichotomy was pointed out by Johnson and Nicolson (2008) who presented data showing that flowers pollinated by specialist passerines are strongly convergent with those pollinated by hummingbirds, and that the most significant dichotomy in bird pollination systems is between specialist and generalist nectarivores, regardless of their phylogenetic affinity.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The absence of this kind of study is mainly due to difficulties in reaching the flowers in the canopy (Prata-de-Assis-Pires & Freitas 2008;Rocca & Sazima 2008). To our knowledge, only a few studies to date have described the pollinators of some ornithophilous species in the canopy (Rocca et al 2006;Rocca & Sazima 2008), as well as the pollinators and reproductive biology of some melittophilous legume tree species (Borges et al 2008;Prata-de-Assis-Pires & Freitas 2008;Wolowski & Freitas 2010;Amorim et al 2013Amorim et al , Ávila et al 2015, and the bee visitors of some mass flowering tree species (Ramalho 2004;Brito & Sazima 2012).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This is a shrub species whose flowering takes place in summer (Ferreira, 1995;Zamith and Scarano, 2004) and whose conspicuous inflorescences might be used for ornamental purposes. S. brasiliensis also presents nectaries to attract bird pollinators (Rocca et al, 2006;Rocca and Sazima, 2008). Initially, the species was included in the Norantea genus (Giraldo-Cañas, 2004), but it now belongs to the Schwartzia genus.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%