1996
DOI: 10.1177/07399863960184005
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Abstract: This study proposed to describe the effect of assimilation on self-concept and abuse in a rural, minority population of Mexican American women. Ethnic language translations were developed to enable investigation with a rural, Spanish-speaking, Mexican American population. Reassessment of reliability and validity of both English and Spanish translations of instrumentation for a rural population was performed. Data were collected through convenience sampling from both rural battered women's shelters and rural co… Show more

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Cited by 37 publications
(33 citation statements)
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“…Champion (1996) found that the abused Mexican American women in her sample were more traditional regarding gender role expectations than non-abused women. She postulated that such traditionalism might lead to situations in which abused women were more likely to stay in the marriage longer because of previous acceptance of the dominant male role, coupled with fears concerning their ability to obtain employment and care for children without the man.…”
Section: Cultural Factors Associated With Mexican-origin Women's Respmentioning
confidence: 86%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Champion (1996) found that the abused Mexican American women in her sample were more traditional regarding gender role expectations than non-abused women. She postulated that such traditionalism might lead to situations in which abused women were more likely to stay in the marriage longer because of previous acceptance of the dominant male role, coupled with fears concerning their ability to obtain employment and care for children without the man.…”
Section: Cultural Factors Associated With Mexican-origin Women's Respmentioning
confidence: 86%
“…The National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence (2003) Moreover, abuse may affect women's perceptions of their ability to provide for their children (Orloff & Little, 1999). Champion (1996) found that abused Mexican American women perceived themselves as being significantly less competent than nonabused women in, among other things, ability to obtain a job and to take care of children and family. Thus, abused Mexican immigrant women may be trapped in a cycle wherein they perceive themselves as less competent nurtures and providers as a result of being abused, and based on these negative-self-perceptions of their capability to provide for their children, may be more likely to stay with abusive partners.…”
Section: Cultural Factors Associated With Mexican-origin Women's Respmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…A plethora of studies have shown that higher levels of acculturation are associated with higher rates of IPV than less acculturated Latinos (Caetano, Schafer, Clark, Cunradi, & Raspberry, 2000;Firestone, Lambert, & Vega, 1999;Ingram, 2007;Kantor, Jasinski, & Aldorondo, 1994). While other studies have shown an association between higher rates of IPV and lower levels or lack of acculturation (Champion, 1996), some have shown no differences in rates of IPV when socioeconomic variables were controlled for (Kantor et al, 1994). It has been suggested that the equivocal findings may actually reflect psychometric limitations or different conceptualizations of acculturation (Kasturirangan, Krishnan, & Riger, 2004;Marín, 1992).…”
Section: Work-related Ipvmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hispanics regarding verbal IPV, there are still few studies that clearly address the issue and, of those, there are contradictory results (e.g., Champion, 1996;Kaufman Kantror, 1994;Ulloa et al, 2004). Study 3 thus sought to explore within-group differences in the role of familial violence, acculturation, and gender role beliefs between FIU and CSUN samples.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The small body of literature on Hispanic IPV provides insight into within-group differences, thus illustrating the need for research on Hispanics (Champion, 1996;Kaufman Kantor et al, 1994). In an attempt to address the diversity in the Hispanic college population, this dissertation draws its sample from two HSI, something made possible by the studies' methodology.…”
Section: Strengths and Significancementioning
confidence: 99%