2006
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.142.9.1157
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Wells Syndrome in Adults and Children

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Cited by 107 publications
(157 citation statements)
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References 5 publications
(6 reference statements)
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“…Characteristic, but not specific, are the clinical findings of erythematous-Hvid plaques, sometimes oedematous or urticaria-like, that may be accompanied by fever, myalgia and (in about 50% of all cases) elevated eosinophilic cells in the blood during the active phase ofthe disease (1)(2)(3). In addition, histological findings show so-called flame figures and further granulomatous infiltration.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Characteristic, but not specific, are the clinical findings of erythematous-Hvid plaques, sometimes oedematous or urticaria-like, that may be accompanied by fever, myalgia and (in about 50% of all cases) elevated eosinophilic cells in the blood during the active phase ofthe disease (1)(2)(3). In addition, histological findings show so-called flame figures and further granulomatous infiltration.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is not recommended a complete hematologic evaluation in all pediatric cases. However, if a child presents with either systemic features, such as fevers, arthralgias, or other organ system involvement, or a chronic course, defined as > 6 months of peripheral eosinophilia or recurrences of clinical disease, then a more systematic assessment should be considered (8).…”
Section: © C I C E D I Z I O N I I N T E R N a Z I O N A L Imentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This rare cutaneous condition lacks systemic involvement, does not respond to antibiotics, requires a high degree of clinical suspicion to diagnose, and presents with peripheral eosinophilia in only about 50% of cases [3]. Cutaneous findings appear cellulitic and most typically present with erythematous plaques preceded by pruritis, but blisters, bullae, or nodules may also be seen.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%