2012
DOI: 10.1177/0954409712459306
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Wayside gauge face lubrication: How much do we really understand?

Abstract: Wayside gauge face lubrication is widely used to minimize rail wear. Scientific understanding of this process is limited; however, there have been significant recent improvements in application equipment. In this paper the process is analyzed in terms of a number of interacting sub-processes, and the factors thought to be important for lubricant and application equipment are reviewed. Wheel/rail contact conditions (pressure and temperature) are also identified as significant variables. Grease stability and ret… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…3 However, initially, it was only applied on the gauge face. 4,5 The introduction of an additional third body known as the top-of-rail friction modifier (TOR-FM), between the top of the rail and the running surface of the wheel, was first studied in 2003. 6 This study is limited to water-based TOR-FMs.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…3 However, initially, it was only applied on the gauge face. 4,5 The introduction of an additional third body known as the top-of-rail friction modifier (TOR-FM), between the top of the rail and the running surface of the wheel, was first studied in 2003. 6 This study is limited to water-based TOR-FMs.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Currently there are very few published papers that focus on the subject of grease pick-up, although there are papers which deal with flange lubrication in general. The effect of lubrication is well documented: wear rates of dry wheel/rail contact can be as much as twenty times higher than lubricated wear rates in sharp curves, which illustrates the importance of proper flange lubrication [2]. The American Association of Railroads estimates that wear caused by ineffective lubrication costs in excess of $US 2 billion per year and Eurostar estimate that lubrication saves £ 1,000,000 per year in maintenance and wheel replacement [3].…”
Section: Grease Lubrication Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is a large body of published research on the effect flange lubrication has on tribological performance of the railways, such as RCF [1][2], retentivity [3], friction and wear [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10]. These tests predominantly use small-scale laboratory tests (either pin-on-disc or twin-disc).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%