volume 7, issue 2, P105-151 1999
DOI: 10.1007/bf02446275
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Abstract: Recent criticisms of the use of historically and ethnographically recorded conflicts as models for warfare in prehistoric times force archaeologists to reexamine assumptions about the frequency, severity, and effects of intergroup fighting. In eastern North America, skeletons of victims and palisaded settlements--the only information consistently available on intergroup hostilities--indicate that the prevalence of conflicts varied greatly over time and space. Occasionally the attacks, typically ambushes of sm…

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