2015
DOI: 10.1177/0884533615584391
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Voiceover Interactive PowerPoint Catheter Care Education for Home Parenteral Nutrition

Abstract: Recorded education led to more patient calls to the HPN clinicians; however, there were no differences between groups in other outcomes.

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Cited by 13 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 16 publications
(30 reference statements)
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“…After reading the selected articles, only three prospective studies that included appropriate data for both PICCs and other CVCs were considered for the final analysis [7,17,18]. We discarded eight articles with retrospective, pediatric, or inpatient data [9,10,19,20,21,22,23,24], two articles with duplicated series of patients [25,26], and seven articles with inappropriately reported infection rates for adequate extraction [27,28,29,30,31,32,33], whereas other reasons for the exclusion of full text articles (such as including several of the above reasons and others, such as different types of reported outcomes apart from catheter-related infections, the use of locks as preventive measures, the type of lipid emulsions, and other unrelated outcomes) are given in Figure 1 (references are listed in the Supplementary material).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…After reading the selected articles, only three prospective studies that included appropriate data for both PICCs and other CVCs were considered for the final analysis [7,17,18]. We discarded eight articles with retrospective, pediatric, or inpatient data [9,10,19,20,21,22,23,24], two articles with duplicated series of patients [25,26], and seven articles with inappropriately reported infection rates for adequate extraction [27,28,29,30,31,32,33], whereas other reasons for the exclusion of full text articles (such as including several of the above reasons and others, such as different types of reported outcomes apart from catheter-related infections, the use of locks as preventive measures, the type of lipid emulsions, and other unrelated outcomes) are given in Figure 1 (references are listed in the Supplementary material).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The optimal mechanism and location for the delivery of training to patients and/or their carers in the administration of HPN remain an area for future research, although it is noteworthy that a recent study demonstrated no increase in CRBSIs when patients are trained at home rather than in hospital, which clearly reduces inpatient length of stay and may also be preferable to patients 30 . Limited data suggest that supporting learning with interactive presentations and computer‐assisted learning can improve patients’ knowledge and reduce postdischarge helpline contacts, but it is unclear whether this will reduce catheter complications 31 . Postdischarge support from the HPN center needs to be available, which can be provided by telephone, videoconference, or patient portal 32 , 33 …”
Section: Prevention Of Catheter‐related Complications: Catheter Carementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Four interventions utilised an interactive educational strategy focused on patients or carers. Two studies were RCT's 26,28 and two were retrospective pre‐post studies 25,27 . All studies focused on increased education around central line care, with one study also including videos on (i) prevention of depression and (ii) improving problem‐solving skills 28 .…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Three studies demonstrated a significant decrease in CLABSI rates with the intervention, 25,27,28 whereas one study showed no difference in CLABSI or rehospitalisation 26 . Smith et al 28 also assessed patient's problem‐solving skills and reactive depression scores, with significant improvements in both at 6 months.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%