2016
DOI: 10.1590/1516-3180.20161343t2 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: New studies have provided more evidence on the effects of supplementing pregnant women with vitamin D alone or with calcium on pregnancy outcomes. Supplementing pregnant women with vitamin D in a single or continued dose increases serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D at term and may reduce the risk of pre-eclampsia, low birthweight and preterm birth. However, when vitamin D and calcium are combined, the risk of preterm birth is increased. The clinical significance of the increased serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
5
7
36
0
1

Year Published

2017
2017
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

7
36
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…It is worth mentioning that confounding factors including diet, seasonality, maternal weight gain during pregnancy, and birth spacing were not significantly different between groups. In accord with our findings, other trials suggested that vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy resulted in improved birth outcomes (Chen et al, ; De‐Regil et al, ; Hollis & Wagner, ; Miliku et al, ; Sablok et al, ; Weernink et al, ; Zerofsky et al, ). It has been reported that maternal vitamin D status was positively and significantly associated with birth size (weight and length; Nandal et al, ; Perez‐Lopez et al, ; Rostami, Ramezani Tehrani, Simbar, Hosseinpanah, & Alavi Majd, ).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
See 2 more Smart Citations
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…It is worth mentioning that confounding factors including diet, seasonality, maternal weight gain during pregnancy, and birth spacing were not significantly different between groups. In accord with our findings, other trials suggested that vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy resulted in improved birth outcomes (Chen et al, ; De‐Regil et al, ; Hollis & Wagner, ; Miliku et al, ; Sablok et al, ; Weernink et al, ; Zerofsky et al, ). It has been reported that maternal vitamin D status was positively and significantly associated with birth size (weight and length; Nandal et al, ; Perez‐Lopez et al, ; Rostami, Ramezani Tehrani, Simbar, Hosseinpanah, & Alavi Majd, ).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…At 34 weeks of gestation, frequency of vitamin D sufficiency in the 2,000‐IU/d group was 1.8 times higher than in the 1,000‐IU/d group. This finding was similar to that of other trials that examined the effectiveness of the same doses of vitamin D supplementation (Cooper et al, ; De‐Regil, Palacios, Lombardo, & Pena‐Rosas, ; Grant et al, ; Hollis, Johnson, Hulsey, Ebeling, & Wagner, ; Roth et al, ; Sahoo, Katam, Das, Agarwal, & Bhatia, ; Zerofsky, Jacoby, Pedersen, & Stephensen, ). Pregnancy‐induced increased body fat mass and hemodilution may explain to some extent the increased vitamin D need of a pregnant woman.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…It is important to note that we excluded trials that combined vitamin D and calcium supplementation: in their meta-analysis, De-Regil et al found that women who received vitamin D and calcium supplements together had an increased risk of PTB (RR, 1.57; 95%CI: 1.02-2.43). 40 Furthermore, studies with sample size >100, low risk of bias, and single-dose vitamin D supplementation all showed that vitamin D supplement could reduce the risk of PTB, but we could not draw a conclusion because the subgroups had only one or two RCTs, and the results may be misleading. Sensitivity analysis of RCT indicated that the Sablok et al 34 and Grant et al studies 37 could both significantly affect the results.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The data from 6 trials of 1,687 ladies who got vitamin D supplements during pregnancy were less likely to be at risk of PTB than those got placebo therapy or routine prenatal care. De-Regil et al (2016) found that ladies who received vitamin D and calcium complements had an increase hazard of PTB [47]. In southern China, a study conducted by showed that daily consumption of 400 µg folic acid alone during the preconception period was linked with a reduction hazard of spontaneous PTB.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning