2011
DOI: 10.1177/1362361310371798 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: People with autism spectrum condition (ASC) perform well on Raven's matrices, a test which loads highly on the general factor in intelligence. However, the mechanisms supporting enhanced performance on the test are poorly understood. Evidence is accumulating that milder variants of the ASC phenotype are present in typically developing individuals, and that those who are further along the autistic-like trait spectrum show similar patterns of abilities and impairments as people with clinically diagnosed ASC. We … Show more

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“…The findings demonstrate a significantly stronger tendency to specifically repeat the harder task more often for the participants with high level of autistic traits. Consistent with other studies showing that the AQ predicts various cognitive abilities similar to that found in ASD (e.g., Fugard et al 2011), these results confirm that a comparable bias toward repetitive behavior—one of the main symptoms of ASD—can also be detected when measuring voluntary task choices in the broader autism phenotype as assessed by the AQ.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…The findings demonstrate a significantly stronger tendency to specifically repeat the harder task more often for the participants with high level of autistic traits. Consistent with other studies showing that the AQ predicts various cognitive abilities similar to that found in ASD (e.g., Fugard et al 2011), these results confirm that a comparable bias toward repetitive behavior—one of the main symptoms of ASD—can also be detected when measuring voluntary task choices in the broader autism phenotype as assessed by the AQ.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…The AQ has been used extensively to investigate the broader ASD phenotype with converging evidence that autism is not just a spectrum within the clinical population, but that autistic traits are continuously distributed through the general population (e.g., Baron-Cohen et al 2001; Hoekstra et al 2007). Many studies have shown that a higher position on the autism-like trait continuum of the AQ predicts cognitive processing similar to but often milder than that found in ASD (e.g., Bayliss et al 2005; Fugard et al 2011; Poljac et al 2012; Ridley et al 2011; Stewart et al 2009; von dem Hagen et al 2011). The AQ seems therefore to be sensitive to, and a useful tool for assessing, the broader ASD phenotype in non-clinical population (e.g., Bishop et al 2004; Wheelwright et al 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…When autistic and non-autistic adults are equal in their accuracy on the Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices, autistic individuals are faster [33]. Even for non-autistic adults, their degree of autistic traits predicts their successful completion of Raven’s Standard Progressive Matrices items that are considered more visual-spatial [34]. Thus, autistic individuals’ performance on the Raven’s Progressive Matrices, the most agreed upon test of abstract spatial reasoning, suggests a strength in abstract spatial reasoning.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…First, Kaland et al (2008a) suggested a link between low FI and limited cognitive skills to solve visuo-constructional problems in a group of children with AS. Second, better attention switching has been shown to predict a higher RPMT overall score in typically developing individuals with variants of the autistic phenotype (Fugard et al, 2011). Finally, Soulieres et al (2011) suggested that high FI in children with AS would provide them with better mechanisms to solve cognitive tasks.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning