2003
DOI: 10.1046/j.1440-1584.2003.00474.x
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Abstract: People with a religious affiliation are more likely to hold beliefs affecting health care choices. It is hypothesised that a religious affiliation, particularly to a Christian religion, is more common outside metropolitan areas, particularly in rural, very elderly and agricultural populations. The study's aim was to test this hypothesis. Rural, very elderly and agricultural populations within regional Victoria were compared with Melbourne on religious affiliations reported in the 1996 census. A religious affil… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…In the 2001 census, 75% of Australians reported having a religious affiliation (6.7% non‐Christian) 19 . The proportion is higher in rural (86%) and elderly (83%) communities 20 . However, the proportion of Australians admitting to a religious affiliation has been declining, particularly in recent times — a fall that cannot be attributed to changes in the wording of the census 21 .…”
Section: Role Of Religion In the Lives Of Australiansmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the 2001 census, 75% of Australians reported having a religious affiliation (6.7% non‐Christian) 19 . The proportion is higher in rural (86%) and elderly (83%) communities 20 . However, the proportion of Australians admitting to a religious affiliation has been declining, particularly in recent times — a fall that cannot be attributed to changes in the wording of the census 21 .…”
Section: Role Of Religion In the Lives Of Australiansmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Census figures show that the proportion of the Australian population claiming some kind of religious affiliation declined from 97.5% in 1901 to 88.9% in 1966, 77.8% in 1981 and 73.9% in 2001 7 . However, religious affiliation varies by demographic characteristics, with levels being especially high among elderly people and people living in non‐metropolitan areas 8 . Time‐use data for Australia have shown that 14% of households engage in some form of religious activity weekly, 10% engage in religious activities daily, and 74% believe in God or a higher life force or spirit 9…”
Section: Levels Of Spiritualitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Social capital, which can also be defined as positive community connections (Agnitsch, Flora, & Ryan, 2006), is thought to be higher in rural places (Dade-Smith, 2004) and is perhaps a factor in the circulation of the anecdotal information commonly associated with CAM use (MacLennan et al, 2002). Spirituality is a concept that encompasses religiosity and is also thought to be found more in rural than metropolitan people (Peach, 2003). Although spirituality has not previously been linked to the health care behavior of rural people, it was thought likely to be associated with the use of mind-body modalities such as prayer and meditation.…”
Section: Rurality Characteristicsmentioning
confidence: 99%