1996
DOI: 10.1016/0021-9290(95)00149-2
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Abstract-Three-dimensional mathematical models of the tibio-femoral joint require input of the geometry of articulating surfaces and ligament insertions, and the mechanical properties of cartilage and ligaments. This paper describes a validation of a knee model through a direct specimen-related comparison between the knee model and the kinematics of four knee joint specimens from which the geometry data were used as input of the model The knee model is quasi-static and is based on equilibrium of forces and mom… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2
1

Citation Types

10
104
0

Year Published

2002
2002
2011
2011

Publication Types

Select...
3
1

Relationship

0
4

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 172 publications
(114 citation statements)
references
References 18 publications
(42 reference statements)
10
104
0
Order By: Relevance
“…The model included the major bony and soft structures of the knee, mainly the ligaments, the cartilage layers, the menisci and the patellar tendon. Previous studies (Bendjaballah et al, 1997;Blankevoort and Huiskes, 1996;Li et al, 1999;Mommersteg et al, 1996) have been conducted to measure the kinematics and the evolution of joint contact areas by using 3D numerical models. Li et al (1999) developed a 3D finite element tibiofemoral joint model (FEM) of a human knee validated by experimental data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The model included the major bony and soft structures of the knee, mainly the ligaments, the cartilage layers, the menisci and the patellar tendon. Previous studies (Bendjaballah et al, 1997;Blankevoort and Huiskes, 1996;Li et al, 1999;Mommersteg et al, 1996) have been conducted to measure the kinematics and the evolution of joint contact areas by using 3D numerical models. Li et al (1999) developed a 3D finite element tibiofemoral joint model (FEM) of a human knee validated by experimental data.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, resection of cruciate ligaments (PCL and ACL) increased the compressive force on the tibia plateau transmitted through the menisci. Blankevoort and Huiskes (1996) have developed a mathematical model of the knee. Their model was simplified by considering ligaments as multiple straight-line elements and not with 3D geometries of the ligaments (Mommersteeg et al, 1996a).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As it can can be seen in Fig. 2, external load stabilizes φ(θ) in the range of θ ∈ (40 • , 80 • ) [30]. As an input for the optimization procedure a squat movement was also successfully used, see, e.g., [20].…”
Section: Kinematic Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Engin and Tumer [29] developed a twodimensional dynamic model of the knee, which included a patella component. Blankevoort and Huiskes [30], and Mommersteeg et al [31], developed and experimentally verified a threedimensional knee model with surrounding soft tissue. More recently, Piazza and Delp [32] presented a rigid body dynamic model of a total knee replacement performing a step-up task.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%