2020
DOI: 10.1051/jbio/2020001
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Utilisation d’extraits méthanoliques de plantes pour la protection des cultures de tomates-cerises (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) contre l’infection fongique par Alternaria alternata

Abstract: La tomate-cerise est un fruit très sujet aux infections fongiques qui peuvent causer des dégâts considérables dans les cultures et lors de la conservation. Les alternarioses comptent parmi les altérations les plus répandues et dangereuses pour ce fruit. Elles sont causées par Alternaria alternata ou d’autres espèces appartenant au même genre. Dans ce travail, nous avons testé l’activité antifongique d’extraits méthanoliques de cinq plantes récoltées dans la région de Jijel (Algérie) sur A. alternata. L’activit… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…These remarks corroborate those of other authors who stipulate that the levels of phenolic compounds and their activities may depend on several intrinsic and extrinsic factors. These factors generally include the nature of the organ, the harvesting period, the extraction technique used, the solvent used, the geographical location and the method used to assess antioxidant activity [23,2] However, the antioxidant activity of extracts from this plant could be attributed to total phenolic compounds and in particular total flavonoids [10]. The presence of phenolic compounds in the leaves of this plant and its interesting antioxidant activity (low IC50) could justify its widespread use by livestock farmers in northern Côte d'Ivoire, particularly those rearing broiler chickens.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…These remarks corroborate those of other authors who stipulate that the levels of phenolic compounds and their activities may depend on several intrinsic and extrinsic factors. These factors generally include the nature of the organ, the harvesting period, the extraction technique used, the solvent used, the geographical location and the method used to assess antioxidant activity [23,2] However, the antioxidant activity of extracts from this plant could be attributed to total phenolic compounds and in particular total flavonoids [10]. The presence of phenolic compounds in the leaves of this plant and its interesting antioxidant activity (low IC50) could justify its widespread use by livestock farmers in northern Côte d'Ivoire, particularly those rearing broiler chickens.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The traditional African pharmacopoeia constitutes a veritable phytopharmacy that could be used in several areas of health care, for both humans and animals and even for plant [1,2,3]. In the specific case of animals, various studies have shown the use of plant-based remedies for their therapeutic management.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The alkaloids extract from Ephedra alanda, showed an outstanding inhibition of A. alternata. The most known of alkaloids in literature is Ephedrine and Pseudoephedrine [16,17] that suggest, the fungus A.altenaria has a sensibity to Ephedra's alkaloids, where aff ect the germination of microconidies, this view is supported by Akroum S, et al study [18] on this fungus by using several types of plants extracts showed that has been an impact onto germination of microconidia and the growth [18].…”
Section: In Vitro Anti-fungal Assaymentioning
confidence: 91%
“…In comparison, the aqueous ammonia extract presented herein would be notably more active. Nonetheless, it should be noted that there would be exceptions, given that Akroum and Rouibah [57] reported an MIC value of 110 µg•mL −1 for a cork methanolic extract against A. alternata. It is also worth noting that, although not comparable (given that inhibition zone values were reported instead of MIC values), other in vitro and in vivo analyses also support the antimicrobial effects of methanolic extracts of oak leaves and stems [13,58].…”
Section: Comparison With Antimicrobial Activities Reported For Other ...mentioning
confidence: 99%