1977
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.113.1.80
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Urticaria. An updated review

Abstract: Urticaria can result from many different stimuli, and numerous factors, both immunologic and nonimmunologic, are involved in its pathogenesis. Most commonly considered of immunologic mechanisms is the type I hypersensitivity state mediated by IgE. Another immunologic mechanism involves the activation of the complement cascade, which produces anaphylatoxins that can release histamine. Immunologic, nonimmunologic, genetic, and modulating factors converge on mast cells and basophils to release mediators capable o… Show more

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Cited by 54 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…3,[5][6][7] Episodes may occur daily or at irregular intervals, 1,2,4 can recur for an indefi nite time 3 and are considered chronic when the clinical picture persists for six weeks or more. 1,3,4,[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] Urticaria-angioedema can attack at any age and particularly affects middle-aged women. [1][2][3][4]6,8,10,[12][13][14]16,17 It is estimated that between 12% and 25% of the general population have already had at least one urticaria-angioedema episode 16,17 and that the prevalence among dermatological patients is around 1.85%.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…3,[5][6][7] Episodes may occur daily or at irregular intervals, 1,2,4 can recur for an indefi nite time 3 and are considered chronic when the clinical picture persists for six weeks or more. 1,3,4,[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] Urticaria-angioedema can attack at any age and particularly affects middle-aged women. [1][2][3][4]6,8,10,[12][13][14]16,17 It is estimated that between 12% and 25% of the general population have already had at least one urticaria-angioedema episode 16,17 and that the prevalence among dermatological patients is around 1.85%.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Cases of chronic urticaria-angioedema were defi ned as such when their duration was six weeks or more, in line with most data in the literature. 1,3,4,[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] Patients with acute or hereditary urticaria-angioedema were excluded from this study.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For the diagnostic workup of such etiologies, screening panels of specific and selective laboratory tests had already been recommended. [27][28][29] Various types of infections were reported to cause acute or chronic urticaria. 29,30 In our patients, infections caused acute urticaria only and were mainly associated with a febrile or systemic illness.…”
Section: Etiological Factorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Approximately 40% of patients with urticaria also experience angioedema. Urticaria is a type-1 hypersensitivity state (Coombs and Gell) triggered by a polyvalent antigen bridging two specific IgE molecules that are bound to mast cells or basophils, leading to release of histamine and other mediators like bradykinin, prostaglandin E1 and E2 (3) . Mast cells the primary effector cells in urticaria are widely distributed in the skin, mucosa and other areas of the body and have highaffinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptors.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Any pattern of recurrent urticaria occurring at least twice a week for at least 6 weeks is called chronic urticaria (6) . Allergenic triggers can be identified in up to 60-80% of acute urticaria cases, (2) while in chronic urticaria the cause may not be found in more than three-fourth of the cases (3) . Several recent studies have shown that contact allergy can play a role in the etiopathogenesis of chronic urticaria (2,7) .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%