2021
DOI: 10.1177/0308518x211007867
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Abstract: During the last three decades, the use of public–private partnerships to deliver urban infrastructure has increased considerably around the world. The objective of this paper is to understand how the availability of private finance that comes with the use of public–private partnerships and, specifically, unsolicited proposals, affects planning. To do so, I investigate the case of Lima, Peru, where between 2009 and 2012 three urban highway projects worth a total of US$1.3bn were approved, and a new metropolitan… Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 38 publications
(28 reference statements)
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“…While analyses of ‘shadow networks’ between elite private and public actors are well established in the critical finance literature on banking (e.g. Carré and Demange, 2017; Louçã and Ash, 2018; McPhilemy, 2013), urban studies is arguably only now building its capacities to foretell and critique deal-making as a city-shaping phenomenon (McManus and Haughton, 2021; O’Brien and Pike, 2019; Stiglich, 2021). Yet, with global finance increasingly presiding over urban infrastructure funding and planning, the spectre of shadow network deal-making outside existing strategic planning norms looms large (O’Brien and Pike, 2019; O’Neill, 2019; Peck and Whiteside, 2016; Weber, 2010).…”
Section: Urban Governance As Deal-makingmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…While analyses of ‘shadow networks’ between elite private and public actors are well established in the critical finance literature on banking (e.g. Carré and Demange, 2017; Louçã and Ash, 2018; McPhilemy, 2013), urban studies is arguably only now building its capacities to foretell and critique deal-making as a city-shaping phenomenon (McManus and Haughton, 2021; O’Brien and Pike, 2019; Stiglich, 2021). Yet, with global finance increasingly presiding over urban infrastructure funding and planning, the spectre of shadow network deal-making outside existing strategic planning norms looms large (O’Brien and Pike, 2019; O’Neill, 2019; Peck and Whiteside, 2016; Weber, 2010).…”
Section: Urban Governance As Deal-makingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In Sydney, the regulatory instrument in question is called the Unsolicited Proposal – an approvals process originally designed for infrastructure provision that has since become a fixture of the broader regulatory landscape of planning (also known in other states as Market-led Proposals), and which appears to be spreading and mutating internationally (Stiglich, 2021). Despite its moniker, the Unsolicited Proposal is designed and driven by the state, which actively solicits unforeseen bids from private actors for major development and infrastructure projects, including bids to supply, redeploy, purchase or redevelop public assets, with an accompanying invitation to corporate representatives to enter confidential discussions with high-level government managers (Rogers and Gibson, 2021; see also Stiglich, 2021).…”
Section: Unsolicited Proposalsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Se trata de un enfoque que busca responder a la problemática suscitada por un modelo de desarrollo urbano que se ha caracterizado por generar en la mayoría de áreas urbanas una cantidad cada vez mayor de desplazamientos a distancias crecientes, situación vinculada al fenómeno de la motorización que ha posibilitado dichos patrones de movilidad (Mollinedo, 2006). Si bien, la mayoría de los viajes siguen realizándose en transporte público, el modelo de desarrollo urbano centrado en el vehículo ha supuesto que las políticas urbanas privilegien la construcción de infraestructura para estos (Rey, 2018;Stiglich, 2019Stiglich, , 2021.…”
Section: Movilidad Urbana Sostenibleunclassified