2004
DOI: 10.1177/0095399703257268 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This article explores the relationship between public administration and deliberative democracy by examining the development in Jürgen Habermas’s thought on public administration. The argument is made that a shift has occurred in the way that Habermas conceptualizes public administration—a shift that makes it possible to see both the plausibility and necessity of a deliberative democratic form of state administration. Shown is how Habermas’s later democratic theory can be used as a resource for those defending… Show more

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“…If a public administrator wants to avoid alienating citizens and include them in the decision-making process, then communicative rationality justifications, such as moral, ethical, and appropriateness explanations, need to be provided to legitimize administrative power. Kelly (2004) provides an example of the two different justifications administrators and citizens bring to the decision-making process for a planning infrastructure project. The question posed for discussion is Should we cut down trees in a neighborhood because of repeated forest fire problem?…”
Section: Social Media and Communicative Rationality Justificationsmentioning
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“…If a public administrator wants to avoid alienating citizens and include them in the decision-making process, then communicative rationality justifications, such as moral, ethical, and appropriateness explanations, need to be provided to legitimize administrative power. Kelly (2004) provides an example of the two different justifications administrators and citizens bring to the decision-making process for a planning infrastructure project. The question posed for discussion is Should we cut down trees in a neighborhood because of repeated forest fire problem?…”
Section: Social Media and Communicative Rationality Justificationsmentioning
“…This need for legitimacy for government’s actions or inactions is derived from the public’s acceptance of sociopolitical expectations and norms. This dynamic is a “fundamental tension between administrative discretion and the democratic legitimacy of administrative power” in collaborative government (Kelly, 2004, p. 39). Democratic legitimacy involves discursive deliberation as well as laws that dictate a public administrator’s actions, such as constitutions, rules, and regulations (White, 1995).…”
Section: Legitimacy and Legitimacy Dilemmamentioning
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“…Communicative rationality is, then, directed towards achieving genuine agreement based on the intersubjective recognition of claims made, at least implicitly, in speech acts. Habermas, seeking to develop and institutionalize different dimensions of reason (Burell 1994), characterizes modern life as an ongoing tension EMERGING INDICATORS AND BUREAUCRACY 465 between instrumental and communicative rationality (Kelly 2004). Instrumental rationality can be understood as following technical rules and can be evaluated in terms of efficacy in influencing the decisions of other actors viewed as potential opponents.…”
Section: Emerging Indicators and Bureaucracymentioning