The Shadow Workforce: Perspectives on Contingent Work in the United States, Japan, and Europe 2006
DOI: 10.17848/9781429454889.ch4
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Cited by 4 publications
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“…That would be the domain of the union partner, assuming the success of its organizing drive, and the reaching of a first contract with one or more W/DCs. The union's collective bargaining contract (CBA) would spell out the temp workers' terms of employment at warehouses under contract and regulate the use of temps (e.g., see Lundy, Roberts, and Becker 2006; Mehta and Theodore 2003–2004, 38–9). Presumably, temp workers sent to union jobsites covered by the CBA would be paid at parity with union workers at the worksite.…”
Section: Strategy: Community Mobilization and Direct Actionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…That would be the domain of the union partner, assuming the success of its organizing drive, and the reaching of a first contract with one or more W/DCs. The union's collective bargaining contract (CBA) would spell out the temp workers' terms of employment at warehouses under contract and regulate the use of temps (e.g., see Lundy, Roberts, and Becker 2006; Mehta and Theodore 2003–2004, 38–9). Presumably, temp workers sent to union jobsites covered by the CBA would be paid at parity with union workers at the worksite.…”
Section: Strategy: Community Mobilization and Direct Actionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“… Although there have been some efforts to accrete temp agency workers into existing bargaining units, or to contractually limit their use (see Lundy, Roberts, and Becker 2006), in many unionized shops, temps have simply been ignored. Temps are sometimes left out of organizing strategies on the basis that they will be less pro‐union.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although literature exists on the challenges TAW poses to trade unions (Heery, 2004;Lundy, Roberts and Becker, 2006) and HRM (Ward, Grimshaw, Rubery and Beynon, 2001;Connell and Burgess, 2002;Koene and van Riemsdijk, 2005;Hall, 2006;Mitlacher, 2008), there is still need to investigate how strategic HR decisions in using temporary workers are formed within firms and which factors shape them. Consistent literature in HRM focuses on studying the conflict, tensions and contradictions associated with the use of TAW.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Contingent workers are those workers who are engaged in nonstandard work or whose employment forms are different from traditional, full‐time, long‐term employment (Hippel et al., 2006). Such forms of employment share the characteristics of short‐term work: variability in work schedule, absence of an implicit or explicit contract, lack of worker attachment to a particular employer, inferior pay and benefits, absence of opportunities for promotion, and lack of opportunity to build human capital (Lundy, Roberts, & Becker, 2006, p. 100). According to the KNSO (2001), basic characteristics of a regular worker include (a) permanent employment, (b) full‐time employment, and (c) employment by a single employer.…”
Section: South Korean Contingent Workers: a Marginalized Classmentioning
confidence: 99%