2010
DOI: 10.1080/09500690903514598 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Despite rapid growth of the biotechnology industry worldwide, a number of public concerns about the application of biotechnology and its regulation remain. In response to these concerns, greater emphasis has been placed on promoting biotechnologists' public engagement. As tertiary science degree programs form the foundation of the biotechnology sector by providing a pipeline of university graduates entering into the profession, it has been proposed that formal science communication training be introduced at th… Show more

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“…It is conceivable they may never receive any formal training in science communication in the course of their career. A previous study of this case has shown that biotechnology undergraduates taking this course do not value communication with nonscientists (Edmondston, Dawson & Schibeci, 2010) and evidence from other studies suggests up to three quarters of scientists do not receive any formal training in science communication (Brown, Propst & Woolley, 2004;Wellcome Trust/MORI, 2000).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…It is conceivable they may never receive any formal training in science communication in the course of their career. A previous study of this case has shown that biotechnology undergraduates taking this course do not value communication with nonscientists (Edmondston, Dawson & Schibeci, 2010) and evidence from other studies suggests up to three quarters of scientists do not receive any formal training in science communication (Brown, Propst & Woolley, 2004;Wellcome Trust/MORI, 2000).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…A study by Edmondston et al (2010b) reported that undergraduate biotechnology students do not value scientific communication and science communication training. Further, the study concluded that their graduates may graduate with only a limited understanding of science communication (Edmondston et al, 2010b). In contrast, it has been shown that undergraduates and graduates who have taken science communication subjects place a high value on these units (Longnecker, 2009).…”
Section: Teaching Oral Communication and Presentation Skills In Undermentioning
“…Furthermore, as a significant portion of undergraduate students will not undertake studies at a postgraduate level, inclusion of science communication training in undergraduate courses becomes even more significant (Edmondston, Dawson & Schibeci, 2010a). It is also proposed that formal science communication training should be introduced in early stages of career development as this form of training will place the students in a better stage as they begin their careers as willing and able scientists after they graduate (Edmondston, Dawson & Schibeci, 2010b). Many academics surveyed believed that graduate attributes were least effectively developed if they were integrated into a late capstone course or left to be developed by the students independently (De La Harpe, Radloff, Scoufis, Dalton, Thomas, Lawson et al, 2009).…”
Section: Teaching Oral Communication and Presentation Skills In Undermentioning
“…Callon et al describe this as expert and lay knowledge produced by 'hybrid forums' [Bucchi and Trench, 2014]. Adopting knowledge co-production has been suggested as a way to guarantee 'the generation and maintenance of public trust' [Edmondston, Dawson and Schibeci, 2010].…”
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