1976
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.112.10.1435
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Umbilical endometrioma (silent type)

Abstract: Umbilical endometrioma is an uncommon entity and is rarely asymptomatic. A 24-year old black woman had an asymptomatic, spontaneous umbilical endometrioma. The lesion was excised and the diagnosis was histologically confirmed.

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Cited by 13 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Endometriosis is a sex hormone-dependent gynecological disease where the functional and morphological endometrial tissues are present outside the uterine cavity [1] . Affecting an estimated 89 million women of reproductive age worldwide, endometriosis occurs in 5% to 10% of all women, often resulting in debilitating pain and infertility [2] .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Endometriosis is a sex hormone-dependent gynecological disease where the functional and morphological endometrial tissues are present outside the uterine cavity [1] . Affecting an estimated 89 million women of reproductive age worldwide, endometriosis occurs in 5% to 10% of all women, often resulting in debilitating pain and infertility [2] .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Endometriosis was first described by an Austrian pathologist, Karl Freiherr von Rokitansky in 1860 who referred to the disease as adenomyoma [ 1 ]. Endometriosis is a rare condition in which ectopic endometrial tissue grows outside the uterine cavity and responds to hormonal stimuli [ 2 ]. Although its prevalence in adult women is not completely known, it is said to occur in 5%–10% [ 3 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The lesion may arise spontaneously in the umbilicus (Popoff et al, 1962;Williams et al, 1976) and rarely in the inguinal region or on the thigh. This tumour is rarely asymptomatic (Williams et al, 1976) and tends to occur in women between 30 and 45. The patients are usually nulliparous or have had one or two children some years prior to the onset of endometriosis.…”
Section: Commentsmentioning
confidence: 99%