1984
DOI: 10.1590/s0074-02761984000400021
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Abstract: Epimastigotes multiplying extracellularly and metacyclic trypomastigotes, stages that correspond to the cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the intestinal lumen of its insect vector, were consistently found in the lumen of the anal glands of opossums Didelphis marsupialis inoculated subcutaneously with infective feces of triatomid bugs.

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Cited by 122 publications
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“…The wild cycle is enzootic and is maintained by triatomines and wild animals, while the peridomestic cycle originated from the wild cycle and maintains the infection among domestic animals in areas surrounding human dwellings through the action of peridomestic triatomines, and occasionally through exchanges with the wild cycle (dogs and cats hunting wild animals, and wild animals, such as rats and Didelphis, invading areas surrounding human dwellings). Deane et al (1984) described a double cycle of T. cruzi: vertebrate and invertebrate cycles in the same mammalian host, Didelphis marsupialis, which is the most important wild reservoir of this parasite. The interrelation of these cycles can be seen in a simplified manner in Fig.…”
Section: Epidemiology Of Chagas Diseasementioning
confidence: 99%
“…The wild cycle is enzootic and is maintained by triatomines and wild animals, while the peridomestic cycle originated from the wild cycle and maintains the infection among domestic animals in areas surrounding human dwellings through the action of peridomestic triatomines, and occasionally through exchanges with the wild cycle (dogs and cats hunting wild animals, and wild animals, such as rats and Didelphis, invading areas surrounding human dwellings). Deane et al (1984) described a double cycle of T. cruzi: vertebrate and invertebrate cycles in the same mammalian host, Didelphis marsupialis, which is the most important wild reservoir of this parasite. The interrelation of these cycles can be seen in a simplified manner in Fig.…”
Section: Epidemiology Of Chagas Diseasementioning
confidence: 99%
“…La transmisión oral por ingestión de alimentos contaminados por heces de triatominos, y orina o secreciones odoríferas de marsupiales, es de gran importancia para la infección humana por Trypanosoma cruzi en la región amazónica (Deane, et al, 1984;Pinto, et al, 2008 Amazonas. 4) La deforestación incontrolada en la región amazónica, con reducción y desplazamiento de los mamíferos silvestres, fuentes naturales de alimentación de los triatomínos, estimula la preadaptación y adaptación de los vectores al domicilio humano en busca de nuevas fuentes alimentarias.…”
unclassified
“…The studies of the interaction of T. cruzi with marsupials, considered to be the most important and probably the most ancient reservoirs, has yielded a series of new data on the biology and ecology of this flagellate. This is exemplified by the cycle undertaken by the parasite in the lumen of the scent glands of Didelphis marsupialis, where the protozoan multiplies as epimastigotes and differentiates into metacyclic forms (Deane et al 1984). The extracellular multiplication cycle of T. cruzi in the scent glands of the opossum D. marsupialis evidences that, besides being a reservoir host, this species can also be a vector of T. cruzi.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Another peculiarity of the interaction of T. cruzi with marsupials, is the effective control of the infection by D. marsupialis and Philander opossum. Moreover, D. marsupialis are able to rapidly control and even eliminate infections with T. cruzi Y strain, while maintaining other strains indefinitely without any significant tissue lesion (Deane et al 1984). P. opossum, on the contrary, maintains both types of strains (Pinho et al 1993).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
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