2006
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.142.7.941
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome: A Pediatric Case

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

1
7
0

Year Published

2008
2008
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
6
3

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 12 publications
(8 citation statements)
references
References 3 publications
1
7
0
Order By: Relevance
“…To date, the pediatric literature highlights the most common association of TTS occurring in association with herpes simplex trigeminal neuritis. 2,3,4 One case highlights similarities to our own with the case of a 5-year-old boy developing extensive TTS in association with a right-sided exophytic juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma that was after he developed a persistent head tilt to the left. Here, postoperative scans showed minimal residual tumor in the lateral brainstem.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…To date, the pediatric literature highlights the most common association of TTS occurring in association with herpes simplex trigeminal neuritis. 2,3,4 One case highlights similarities to our own with the case of a 5-year-old boy developing extensive TTS in association with a right-sided exophytic juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma that was after he developed a persistent head tilt to the left. Here, postoperative scans showed minimal residual tumor in the lateral brainstem.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 63%
“…[ 1 ] The ulcers usually develop within 2 years of trigeminal nerve injury but the period may vary from several weeks to many years. [ 1 ] Pediatric TTS is all the more rare, with only a few previously reported cases in the literature,[ 1 2 3 4 ] listed in Table 1 .…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…4 Trigeminal trophic syndrome manifests itself as a unilateral crescent-shaped ulceration around the nasal ala, but in severe cases, there may be involvement of the jaw, forehead, cheek, and lip. We know of only 3 previously reported pediatric cases, [5][6][7] and, to our knowledge, TTS has never been successfully treated with a vacuum-dressing device.…”
Section: Commentmentioning
confidence: 99%