1970
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.102.2.129
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Trichotillomania. A clinicopathologic study

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Cited by 44 publications
(32 citation statements)
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“…6,7 Rates of TTM are higher in children than in adults. 8,9 The common sites of pulling hair are scalp, eyelashes and eyebrows, and pubic hair among adults. 10 Age of onset of TTM is usually in childhood with mean age of onset at 9-10 years.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…6,7 Rates of TTM are higher in children than in adults. 8,9 The common sites of pulling hair are scalp, eyelashes and eyebrows, and pubic hair among adults. 10 Age of onset of TTM is usually in childhood with mean age of onset at 9-10 years.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[5,6] Late onset cases (around the beginning of puberty) are thought to increase the likelihood of a more chronic condition, pulling from multiple sites and having higher rates of psychiatric comorbidity. [3,[7][8][9][10] The clinical presentation of TTM is similar regardless of age, although one study reported that scalp pulling was significantly greater among children (aged 1-5) when compared to adults (aged 181) and eyelash pulling was significantly less in childhood compared to youth/adolescence (ages 6-17). [2] The bulk of the adult TTM treatment literature is in the form of case reports and open label trials using a wide variety of pharmacological agents, ranging from first line OCD treatments (antidepressants) to topical ointments to analgesics and most recently, the anticonvulsant topiramate [11] and the opiod antagonist, naltrexone.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prevalence estimates for adults with TTM range from 0.6% to 3.4%, depending on the extent to which criterion B and C are applied, and the disorder is more common among females [4]. TTM may be more prevalent [5] and the gender distribution more balanced in children [6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%