2018
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Abstract: Reactive perforating dermatosis is a rare chronic skin disease defined by the transepidermal elimination of collagen and/or elastin. In the acquired form in adults, it is frequently associated with diseases such as diabetes and chronic renal failure. No systematic reviews of treatment options are available for this disease. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize all reported treatment options for acquired reactive perforating dermatosis (ARPD). This is a systematic review based on a MEDLINE search o… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(17 citation statements)
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References 79 publications
(83 reference statements)
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“…In contrast with previous series, only 37.8% of the patients had a complete response, emphasizing the need for other treatment options . Successful outcomes with tetracyclines, allopurinol, phototherapy, systemic retinoids, and systemic steroids have been reported . In this series, few patients were treated with doxycycline and allopurinol, and both drugs were not an effective treatment alternative.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 73%
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“…In contrast with previous series, only 37.8% of the patients had a complete response, emphasizing the need for other treatment options . Successful outcomes with tetracyclines, allopurinol, phototherapy, systemic retinoids, and systemic steroids have been reported . In this series, few patients were treated with doxycycline and allopurinol, and both drugs were not an effective treatment alternative.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 73%
“…2,3 Successful outcomes with tetracyclines, allopurinol, phototherapy, systemic retinoids, and systemic steroids have been reported. [2][3][4][30][31][32] In this series, few patients were treated with doxycycline and allopurinol, and both drugs were not an effective treatment alternative. Acitretin, systemic steroids, and phototherapy were the treatments associated with the best outcome and should be considered in the management of patients with disseminated lesions and severe pruritus, as well as in those who have a poor response to topical therapies.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%
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“…Currently, there is no definitive or efficient treatment for APD (5,8,22,23). Topical steroids and oral antihistamines are the most commonly prescribed drugs, which primarily aim to control the symptoms (5,8,22,23).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%