2020
DOI: 10.5334/labphon.278
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Transphonologization of voicing in Chru: Studies in production and perception

Abstract: Chru, a Chamic language of south-central Vietnam, has been described as combining contrastive obstruent voicing with incipient registral properties (Fuller, 1977). A production study reveals that obstruent voicing has already become optional and that the voicing contrast has been transphonologized into a register contrast based primarily on vowel height (F1). An identification study shows that perception roughly matches production in that F1 is the main perceptual cue associated with the contrast. Structured v… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(8 citation statements)
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“…The contours are smoothed with loess and the shading displays a 95% confidence interval. To facilitate the visual interpretation of the figure, the z-normalized f0 is converted back to the Hz scale using the group mean (Brunelle et al, 2020), and the f0 contours of the entire duration of the post-onset vowels are plotted instead of the first 35% used in the statistical analysis. The vertical dotted line is added to indicate the 35% threshold included in the statistical analysis.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The contours are smoothed with loess and the shading displays a 95% confidence interval. To facilitate the visual interpretation of the figure, the z-normalized f0 is converted back to the Hz scale using the group mean (Brunelle et al, 2020), and the f0 contours of the entire duration of the post-onset vowels are plotted instead of the first 35% used in the statistical analysis. The vertical dotted line is added to indicate the 35% threshold included in the statistical analysis.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…F0 onsets were higher in the voiceless aspirated stops than voiceless unaspirated and voiced unaspirated stops. This suggests that Shina is among those languages where aspiration has a raising effect on the F0 onsets of the following vowels (Chru: Brunelle et al 2020;Khmer, Central Thai, and Northern Vietnamese: Kirby 2018a;Madurese: Misnadin 2016: Thai: Shimizu 1989 but it differs from other languages where voiceless unaspirated stops raise the F0 onsets (Burushaski: Hussain 2021; Burmese: Shimizu 1989; Cantonese: Luo et al 2016;Hindi: Shimizu 1989;Kalasha: Hussain and Mielke 2020;Mandarin: Luo et al 2016;Marathi: Dmitrieva and Dutta 2020;Shanghai Chinese: Luo et al 2016). Voiceless aspirated stops are produced with a wider opening of the vocal cords so that the air can pass through without any obstruction (Kim et al 2010).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Voiceless unaspirated stops of Burushaski (Hussain 2021), Cantonese, Mandarin (Luo et al 2016), Kalasha (Hussain and Mielke 2020), Marathi (Dmitrieva and Dutta 2020), and Shanghai Chinese (Chen 2011) showed higher F0 onsets than voiceless aspirated stops. In contrast, voiceless unaspirated stops of Chru (Brunelle et al 2020), Madurese (Misnadin 2016), and Thai (Shimizu 1989) entailed lower F0 onsets than voiceless aspirated stops. Dzongkha's voiceless unaspirated and aspirated categories showed high F0 onsets, indicating no clear differences (Lee and Kawahara 2018).…”
Section: Acoustic Correlates Of Laryngeal Contrastsmentioning
confidence: 92%
“…Outliers beyond 2.5 standard deviations for each gender group were excluded, which resulted in Hertz ranges from approximately 124-286 Hz for female speakers, and 66-180 Hz for male speakers. All f0 measurements were then z-normalized based on an R script from Brunelle et al (2020). Following their methodology, z-normalized f0 values were then converted back into Hertz-like measurements for readability.…”
Section: Procedurementioning
confidence: 99%
“…These two processes are similar in that high tones and registers originate from voiceless stops, and low tones and registers originate from voiced stops. While tonogenesis occurs from the phonologization of f0 differences, registrogenesis can include f0, F1, F2, VOT, vowel length, and phonation type (Brunelle & Kirby 2016;Brunelle et al 2020).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%