2017
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101332
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Elder women suffer from low or loss of fertility because of decreasing oocyte quality as maternal aging. As energy resource, mitochondria play pivotal roles in oocyte development, determining oocyte quality. With advanced maternal age, increased dysfunctions emerge in oocyte mitochondria, which decrease oocyte quality and its developmental potential. Mitochondria supplement as a possible strategy for improving egg quality has been in debate due to ethnic problems. Heterogeneity is an intractable problem even t… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

2
45
0

Year Published

2018
2018
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
4

Relationship

0
4

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 29 publications
(47 citation statements)
references
References 30 publications
(31 reference statements)
2
45
0
Order By: Relevance
“…It should be noted that there is a recent report that mitochondrial transfer from ADSCs can improve oocyte quality and infertility in aged ICR mice (Wang et al, ). The study showed that the autologous transfer of mitochondria from ADSCs improved blastocyst formation rates in vitro from 15% to 30% in 12‐month‐old ICR mice.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It should be noted that there is a recent report that mitochondrial transfer from ADSCs can improve oocyte quality and infertility in aged ICR mice (Wang et al, ). The study showed that the autologous transfer of mitochondria from ADSCs improved blastocyst formation rates in vitro from 15% to 30% in 12‐month‐old ICR mice.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…By directly comparing the outcomes obtained using eggs from the same IVF cycle of the same patient, with the only variable being whether AUGMENT was included, these types of studies argue strongly that an exogenous, but autologous, germline mitochondrial boost significantly enhances the post-fertilization developmental competency of human eggs. Continuing studies in animal models have not only supported these observations [ 117 ], but have also raised the question of whether mitochondria from germline stem cells or adult stem cells in general are needed to achieve a restoration of egg and embryo quality in aged females [ 118 ].…”
Section: Boosting Egg and Embryo Quality Through Exogenous Mitochomentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One centers on potential functional differences in mitochondria, or more specifically mitochondrial subtypes, derived from the donor cells when compared with the mitochondrial population present in eggs of aged females, that are outside of the realm of energetics. Notably, in published examples of where an exogenous mitochondrial boost has been reported to improve post-fertilization outcomes in recipient eggs, the donor cells are either from chronologically younger females [ 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 ] or from stem-like cells that are chronologically the same age as the recipient eggs, from a whole organism perspective, but nonetheless younger from a cellular differentiation perspective [ 52 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 118 ]. If cross-talk between the nucleus and specific mitochondrial subpopulations is disrupted by maternal aging such that mitochondria in eggs become inherently unable to receive or process instructions provided by nuclear-coded gene products trafficked to these organelles, injection of a bolus of non-compromised or responsive donor mitochondria may help restore homeostatic function in eggs needed for embryogenesis to progress successfully.…”
Section: Boosting Egg and Embryo Quality Through Exogenous Mitochomentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, the frequency of chromosome segregation errors during meiosis I in mouse oocytes increased with age . Aged oocytes were associated with low fertility, low developmental ability, and aberrant kinetics of the epigenome . In addition, ovarian aging, including the follicles themselves and granulosa cells, affected the reproductive outcomes in many species, including humans .…”
Section: Outstanding Issuesmentioning
confidence: 99%