2006
DOI: 10.1350/ijps.2006.8.4.326
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Abstract: Although there has been, for many years, a growing body of literature considering aspects of general management in business and commerce, much of it has little direct applicability to policing. Much of the police-related management material is poorly integrated with the realities of policing and tends not to form an academic discipline in its own right. Police management as an academic discipline is best described as the study of the management of discretion in the regulation of community conflict. It is the i… Show more

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“…Extant literature discussing leadership in policing can be generally categorized into two groups. First, a body of writings (particularly textbooks) has addressed how general theories of organizations and leadership might be applied within policing contexts (Adlam and Villiers, 2003;Haberfeld, 2006;Meese and Ortmeier, 2004), often with little or no empirical validation (Collins, 2005;Domonoske, 2006) [1]. Second, empirical research has sought to describe how ranked personnel go about engaging in the acts of leadership, management, and supervision, particularly through the development of behavioral typologies (Brehm and Gates, 1993;Engel, 2001).…”
Section: Literature Reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Extant literature discussing leadership in policing can be generally categorized into two groups. First, a body of writings (particularly textbooks) has addressed how general theories of organizations and leadership might be applied within policing contexts (Adlam and Villiers, 2003;Haberfeld, 2006;Meese and Ortmeier, 2004), often with little or no empirical validation (Collins, 2005;Domonoske, 2006) [1]. Second, empirical research has sought to describe how ranked personnel go about engaging in the acts of leadership, management, and supervision, particularly through the development of behavioral typologies (Brehm and Gates, 1993;Engel, 2001).…”
Section: Literature Reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%