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Cited by 3 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 14 publications
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“…The World Health Organization recommends high-dose vitamin A supplementation for infants and young children in places where vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem, as indicated by a prevalence rate of night blindness of 1% or higher in children 24–59 months of age, or in situations where vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol ≤ 0.7 µmol/L) is 20% or higher in infants and children 6–59 months of age. However, the policy and practice of administering high-dose vitamin A (defined as 25,000 to 50,000 IU vitamin A, equivalent to 7.5 mg and 15 mg retinol equivalents, respectively) to reduce child mortality has been strongly challenged and has led to reports of acute toxicity [180], ranging from increased intracranial pressure, bone demineralization and growth restriction, to mental retardation and death [181,182]. In a review of 21 studies evaluating the effect of vitamin A supplementation in community settings on all-cause mortality, 12 also reported cause-specific mortality for diarrhea and pneumonia and six reported measles-specific mortality.…”
Section: Could Other Risk Factors Be Involved?mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The World Health Organization recommends high-dose vitamin A supplementation for infants and young children in places where vitamin A deficiency is a public health problem, as indicated by a prevalence rate of night blindness of 1% or higher in children 24–59 months of age, or in situations where vitamin A deficiency (serum retinol ≤ 0.7 µmol/L) is 20% or higher in infants and children 6–59 months of age. However, the policy and practice of administering high-dose vitamin A (defined as 25,000 to 50,000 IU vitamin A, equivalent to 7.5 mg and 15 mg retinol equivalents, respectively) to reduce child mortality has been strongly challenged and has led to reports of acute toxicity [180], ranging from increased intracranial pressure, bone demineralization and growth restriction, to mental retardation and death [181,182]. In a review of 21 studies evaluating the effect of vitamin A supplementation in community settings on all-cause mortality, 12 also reported cause-specific mortality for diarrhea and pneumonia and six reported measles-specific mortality.…”
Section: Could Other Risk Factors Be Involved?mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Such a possibility is amplified by the cumulative micronutrient intake generated by the number of overlapping public health interventions and the commercial availability of fortified processed foods and over‐the‐counter dietary supplements. The chronic and acute adverse effects of excessive preformed vitamin A intakes during prolonged or short periods of time are well documented and include bone fragility, liver damage, skin disorders, increased intracranial pressure, and teratogenicity . Excessive folic acid consumption has been associated with vitamin B12 deficiency, anemia, and cognitive impairment in the certain population groups .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The chronic and acute adverse effects of excessive preformed vitamin A intakes during prolonged or short periods of time are well documented and include bone fragility, liver damage, skin disorders, increased intracranial pressure, and teratogenicity. 2,3 Excessive folic acid consumption has been associated with vitamin B12 deficiency, anemia, and cognitive impairment in the certain population groups. 4 Adverse effects caused by a longtime exposure to iodine excess in pregnant women and particularly in children include hyperthyrotropinemia, increased risk of developing goiter, and impaired motor and verbal communication development.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%