2019
DOI: 10.3389/fendo.2019.00285
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The Role of Osteocytes in Inflammatory Bone Loss

Abstract: Osteoimmunology investigations to-date have demonstrated the significant interactions between bone surface cells, osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and immune cells. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on osteocytes, cells embedded in the bone matrix, and their role in inflammation and inflammatory bone loss. Osteocytes communicate through various mechanisms; directly via dendritic processes and through secretion of proteins that can influence the formation and activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Some ost… Show more

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Cited by 51 publications
(30 citation statements)
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“…NFATc1 is the master transcription factor in osteoclast differentiation. NFATc1 with AP-1 (Fos/Jun), PU.1, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor form specific transcription complexes, which then act in the promoter region of genes, such as TRAP, CTR, cathepsin K, β 3 integrin, and OSCAR, which are related to the osteoclast attachment, migration, acidification, and degradation of bone matrix [23,24]. This study indicated that MCPEO affected the expression of NFATc1 and AP1 family proteins during osteoclast differentiation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 76%
“…NFATc1 is the master transcription factor in osteoclast differentiation. NFATc1 with AP-1 (Fos/Jun), PU.1, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor form specific transcription complexes, which then act in the promoter region of genes, such as TRAP, CTR, cathepsin K, β 3 integrin, and OSCAR, which are related to the osteoclast attachment, migration, acidification, and degradation of bone matrix [23,24]. This study indicated that MCPEO affected the expression of NFATc1 and AP1 family proteins during osteoclast differentiation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 76%
“…Osteocytes are the longest living cell type in the bone, they develop dendritic processes known as canaliculi networks, which are essential for cell communication. Osteocytes are responsive to the mechanosensory adaptation of the skeleton [41] and the secretion of sclerostin and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) by osteocytes regulate osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively [42,43]. The significance of osteocytes in regulating hematopoiesis was observed in mouse models lacking osteocytes, in which both B and T lymphopoiesis were severely impaired [44].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, the LAMP-2 knock-out mice did not show a bone phenotype, thus suggesting properly functioning osteoclasts. To come up with an explanation for the differences between the in vivo and in vitro findings we assume that other cell types such as osteocytes and T-cells, from which is known that they have the capacity to express RANKL, facilitated osteoclastogenesis [ 41 , 42 , 43 , 44 ]. In this way the inability of osteoblasts to express RANKL might be compensated by other cell types.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%