2016
DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2016.00103
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Abstract: Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neu… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 45 publications
(59 reference statements)
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“…; Pinto et al . ). Therefore we analysed whether A 1 adenosine receptor‐ and cGMP‐dependent pathways may be involved in the 2‐PAA‐induced enhancement of the gap junction coupling.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 97%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…; Pinto et al . ). Therefore we analysed whether A 1 adenosine receptor‐ and cGMP‐dependent pathways may be involved in the 2‐PAA‐induced enhancement of the gap junction coupling.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…; Pinto et al . ). The following findings, however, argue against the involvement of the A 1 adenosine receptor in the action of 2‐PAA on the gap junction coupling.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Manipulating the duration of ischemia in hippocampal slices revealed sequential changes to synaptic transmission with varying levels of reversibility strongly influenced by A 1 Rs: 1) a rapid direct inhibition, 2) a slower onset of A 1 R-independent inhibition, 3) a transient reappearance of activity, and 4) an irreversible loss of transmission. The initial reversible inhibition is a well-known phenomenon caused by A 1 Rs (Latini et al 1999) that inhibit presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (Gundlfinger et al 2007;Wu and Saggau 1994) in glutamatergic nerve terminals (Rebola et al 2005); the NOS-cGMP pathway also appears to be involved (Pinto et al 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…By blocking NOS, sGC and PKG, Cascalheira et al demonstrated that A 1 R-induced inhibition of neurotransmission in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices is partly mediated by the NO/cGMP pathway [ 181 , 182 ]. In cardiomyocytes, the activation of A 1 Rs stimulates NOS through activation of PLC and subsequent increase in Ca 2+ /calmodulin and PKC activity [ 183 ].…”
Section: A 1 R Signalingmentioning
confidence: 99%