2017
DOI: 10.1590/0034-7329201700213
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The role of Brazil in multilateral disarmament efforts

Abstract: • Este é um artigo publicado em acesso aberto e distribuído sob os termos da Licença de Atribuição Creative Commons, que permite uso irrestrito, distribuição e reprodução em qualquer meio, desde que o autor e a fonte originais sejam creditados.http://www.scielo.br/rbpi Revista Brasileira de Política Internacional ISSN 1983-3121 The role of Brazil in multilateral disarmament efforts DOI: http AbstractThis article examines Brazil's motivations, objectives, and action in international instances related to nuc… Show more

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“…To take one important example, in the 1990s and 2000s Brazil pursued a foreign policy that was distinct from that of the USA but which nonetheless advanced certain liberal goals and priorities. Under the Cardoso and Lula administrations, Brazil joined the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, continued to promote disarmament and denuclearisation, and sought to take the initiative on the global issue of hunger – a foreign policy that was justified by appeal to the values of ‘humanism’ and ‘solidarity’ (de Faria and Paradis, 2013; de Queiroz Duarte, 2017). These are not the features of an illiberal foreign policy, and Brazil seems to have been fully committed to ‘principled multilateralism’, yet during this period Brazil voted very differently to the USA within the UN.…”
Section: Literature Reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To take one important example, in the 1990s and 2000s Brazil pursued a foreign policy that was distinct from that of the USA but which nonetheless advanced certain liberal goals and priorities. Under the Cardoso and Lula administrations, Brazil joined the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, continued to promote disarmament and denuclearisation, and sought to take the initiative on the global issue of hunger – a foreign policy that was justified by appeal to the values of ‘humanism’ and ‘solidarity’ (de Faria and Paradis, 2013; de Queiroz Duarte, 2017). These are not the features of an illiberal foreign policy, and Brazil seems to have been fully committed to ‘principled multilateralism’, yet during this period Brazil voted very differently to the USA within the UN.…”
Section: Literature Reviewmentioning
confidence: 99%