2017
DOI: 10.1007/s00223-017-0254-7 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with decreased bone mineral density and increased risk of fracture. The aim of this study was to assess bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), trabecular microarchitecture and estimated failure load in weight-bearing vs. non-weight-bearing bones in AN. We included twenty-five females with AN, and twenty-five female controls matched on age and height. Bone geometry, vBMD and trabecular microarchitecture were assessed using high-resolution peripheral quantitati… Show more

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“…A case-control study of twenty-five women (18 to 40 years) with anorexia nervosa, and twenty-five female controls matched on age and height, found that deficits in cortical thickness and estimated failure load were more pronounced in the weight-bearing tibia, compared to the non-weight-bearing radius, implying a direct effect of low body weight on bone loss in anorexia nervosa. (31) Our observation of worse bone outcomes at the tibia than the radius following weight loss is consistent with these findings in anorexic individuals.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…A case-control study of twenty-five women (18 to 40 years) with anorexia nervosa, and twenty-five female controls matched on age and height, found that deficits in cortical thickness and estimated failure load were more pronounced in the weight-bearing tibia, compared to the non-weight-bearing radius, implying a direct effect of low body weight on bone loss in anorexia nervosa. (31) Our observation of worse bone outcomes at the tibia than the radius following weight loss is consistent with these findings in anorexic individuals.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…Indices of trabecular bone microarchitecture were similar at both sites. We adjusted our data for body weight because weight is known to affect HR-pQCT parameters [31,32]. The weight-adjusted analysis aimed at elucidating whether the changes in bone microstructure were due to hypothyroidism per se, or merely related to alterations in body weight.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…In the Global Burden of Disease study published from 2013, eating disorders (ED) were ranked 12th among 305 diseases in women with the highest disability adjusted life years (Erskine et al, 2016; GBD 2013 DALYs and HALE Collaborators, 2015). The inherent symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) can ultimately lead to various severe somatic complications (Forney et al, 2016; Katzman, 2005; Mitchell & Crow, 2006) including high risks of cardiovascular complications (Sachs et al, 2016), gastrointestinal complications (Norris et al, 2016), bone diseases (Frolich et al, 2017; Misra et al, 2016), heightened fracture risk (Frolich et al, 2020; Vestergaard et al, 2002), renal complications (Stheneur et al, 2014), obstetric and gynecologic problems (Andersen & Ryan, 2009; Kimmel et al, 2016), and orofacial manifestations (Romanos et al, 2012). It has also been proposed that AN and autoimmune disease might have an underlying common etiology (Raevuori et al, 2014) supported by the skewed gender distribution for both diseases (Acres et al, 2012; Fetissov et al, 2002; Quintero et al, 2012).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning