1992
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Abstract: The relationship between perceived status in politics and judged physical stature is investigated. Comparison of estimated heights of Canadian federal party leaders before and after the 1988 federal election indicated that the losers. Broadbent and Turner, were judged to be shorter afterwards, while the winner, Mulroney, was judged taller. Although the relationship between status and judged height has previously been demonstrated, this result indicates that it is dynamic (i.e., election outcomes alter rated ta… Show more

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Cited by 50 publications
(52 citation statements)
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References 12 publications
(17 reference statements)
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“…Sorokowski (2010) similarly cites Gillis (1982), stating that 'between 1900 and 1968, the taller candidate always came first'. Using a different sample of elections, Higham and Carment (1992) conclude that US presidents elected between 1905 and 1980 were significantly The importance of height to US presidential election success is in line with other research showing that height is related to leadership qualities. Taller people, particularly men, are more likely to emerge as leaders in a group and more often occupy a leadership or managerial position (Gawley, Perks, & Curtis, 2009;Stogdill, 1948).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 81%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Sorokowski (2010) similarly cites Gillis (1982), stating that 'between 1900 and 1968, the taller candidate always came first'. Using a different sample of elections, Higham and Carment (1992) conclude that US presidents elected between 1905 and 1980 were significantly The importance of height to US presidential election success is in line with other research showing that height is related to leadership qualities. Taller people, particularly men, are more likely to emerge as leaders in a group and more often occupy a leadership or managerial position (Gawley, Perks, & Curtis, 2009;Stogdill, 1948).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 81%
“…In reality, Nixon was over five centimeters taller than Carter. More generally, the losing candidates in political elections are judged to be shorter, whereas winners are judged as taller than they were prior to elections (Higham & Carment, 1992). People also judge the politicians that they support to be taller than the politicians they oppose (Sorokowski, 2010).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…The heights of the student and class president were under-estimated-that is, they were believed to be shorter than they really were-and the heights of the administrator and instructor were over-estimated. Still other studies of the perceived height of people who had different levels of authority (or were described to participants in the experiments as having different amounts of authority) have shown similar results (e.g., see Higham and Carment 1992;Roberts and Herman 1986;Tom and Shevell 1986;Wilson 1968). People who are believed by the respondent to have higher authority are often reported to be taller than others who are believed to have lesser authority.…”
Section: Review Of Theoretical and Empirical Literaturementioning
confidence: 55%
“…Consonant with the thesis that the mechanisms undergirding prestige assessment are derived from those responsible for dominance assessment, a parallel literature documents that physical size is also used in reasoning about social hierarchies (Higham & Carment, 1992;Marsh, Yu, Schechter, & Blair, 2009;Masters, Poolton, & van der Kamp, 2010). Many languages and practices equate size with social rank (Fiske & Fiske, 2007).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%