2013
DOI: 10.1177/0308575913500021 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: The cutting-edge scientific research that is emerging regarding the neurobiological consequences of early maltreatment and neglect is highly relevant for thinking about the diverse needs of adopted and fostered children. Knowledge about the science has an important role to play in many areas, from child care proceedings to the mental health and educational needs of adopted children and young people. However, the science is complex and it is difficult to provide a succinct but valid summary of the rapidly expan… Show more

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“…Researchers have found that interventions targeting attachment are necessary in helping children overcome issues stemming from multiple or chronic early adversities (Cook et al, 2005 ; Dozier, Albus, Fisher, & Sepulveda, 2002 ; Hawk & McCall, 2010 ; MacLean, 2003 ). Improving the quality of caregiving, including increasing caregiver sensitivity, can lead to improvements in children's behavior and attachment (Woolgar, 2013 ). Likewise, providing parents with education about increasing their sensitivity and empathy toward their adolescents has led to behavioral improvements as well (Giannotta, Ortega, & Stattin, 2013).…”
Section: Trust-based Relational Intervention As Trauma-informed Carementioning
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“…Researchers have found that interventions targeting attachment are necessary in helping children overcome issues stemming from multiple or chronic early adversities (Cook et al, 2005 ; Dozier, Albus, Fisher, & Sepulveda, 2002 ; Hawk & McCall, 2010 ; MacLean, 2003 ). Improving the quality of caregiving, including increasing caregiver sensitivity, can lead to improvements in children's behavior and attachment (Woolgar, 2013 ). Likewise, providing parents with education about increasing their sensitivity and empathy toward their adolescents has led to behavioral improvements as well (Giannotta, Ortega, & Stattin, 2013).…”
Section: Trust-based Relational Intervention As Trauma-informed Carementioning
“…Such children with histories of out-of-home care have all experienced separation from their primary attachment figures, and may have experienced traumatic circumstances such as witnessing violence in the home, armed conflict, exposure to natural disasters, or other chaotic or threatening environments (Hoskbergen & van Dijkum, 2001 ). In particular, those who have experienced repeated trauma due to maltreatment, abuse, and/or neglect often experience complex and individualized neurodevelopmental deficits, leading to maladaptive functioning, including emotional and behavioral issues (Painter & Scannapieco, 2013 ; Woolgar, 2013 ) that can persist and worsen over time (van der Vegt, van der Ende, Ferdinand, Verhulst, & Tiemeier, 2009 ; Verhulst, 2000 ). Such early adversity is often experienced by children with histories of out-of-home care, including institutional and foster placements (for a review of the literature, see Dovran, Winje, Arefjor, & Haugland, 2012 ; Euser, Alink, Tharner, van IJzendoorn, & Bakersmans-Kranenburg, 2013 , 2014 ; Hobbs & Hobbs, 1999 ; Johnson & Dole, 1999 ).…”
mentioning
“…Thus, children who remain in the care of their birth family for longer are more likely to have experienced a higher number of ACEs for a protracted period of time [32]. Compounding this, early adversity is likely to involve multiple sources of risk that occur during crucial developmental stages [33], which may affect physiology and brain maturation [34,35]. While children who are removed at birth may be spared the impact of ACEs in early childhood, they are still vulnerable in terms of their care experience (i.e., repeated separations from caregivers and unstable living arrangements, their genetic history [36], and the higher likelihood of exposure to prenatal adversity, such as drug and alcohol abuse [37]).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…It is now firmly established that the early years constitute a critical period for brain development and any exposure to adversity of prenatal insults or postnatal traumatic experiences, especially in the preschool age, will have profound impact on children’s and young people’s cognitive, social and emotional development, affecting them into adult life (Department for Education, 2019b; Norbury, et al., 2017; Woolgar, 2013). Looked after children and young people are especially vulnerable in this respect and although it is seems something of a chimera at the moment, the need for effective early support is clear to prevent the complex needs of children and families from escalating.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning