Cultural and Social History volume 5, issue 4, P411-422 2008 DOI: 10.2752/147800408x341622 View full text
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Clare Anderson

Abstract: ABSTRACT The history of imprisonment in British colonial Mauritius is intertwined with its political economy, most especially the relationship between metropolitan government and plantation owners. Whether labour were predominantly enslaved, apprenticed or indentured, incarceration was part of a broader process through which the regulation of the colonial workforce was taken from the private to the public sphere and became associated with economic development. Nevertheless, prisoners both challenged and used …

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