Dialoganalyse III, Teil 1 1991
DOI: 10.1515/9783111678504-034
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The Place of Dialogue in Children's Construction of Meaning

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Cited by 7 publications
(5 citation statements)
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“…Discussions allow the adult and child to build knowledge jointly, with the adult supplying additional information not present in the text. Adult comments that provide conceptual knowledge have been associated with improved vocabulary growth (Barnes, Dickinson, & Grifenhagen, ; Neuman et al, ), which is associated with conceptual knowledge (Halliday, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Discussions allow the adult and child to build knowledge jointly, with the adult supplying additional information not present in the text. Adult comments that provide conceptual knowledge have been associated with improved vocabulary growth (Barnes, Dickinson, & Grifenhagen, ; Neuman et al, ), which is associated with conceptual knowledge (Halliday, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…SBR is an interaction whereby an adult reads and discusses a book with a young, nonreading child (van Kleeck, Gillam, Hamilton, & McGrath, ). From a constructivist perspective, the conversations between the adult and child are seen as experiences that promote the construction of meaning in a shared context (Halliday, ). Discussions during book reading may build children's conceptual knowledge (Neuman, Newman, & Dwyer, ), involve decontextualized talk about events and places distant from the present (Dickinson & Smith, ), promote and model complex vocabulary and language (Dickinson & Porche, ), and model speech‐to‐print connections (Justice, Weber, Ezell, & Bakeman, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Winn Tutwiler (2005) notes, ‘the home is not only the first site for learning knowledge and skills; it is also the place where children learn how to learn’ (p. 186). From their first days, children learn to co-construct meaning as they take part in exchanging attention with their caregiver (Halliday, 2004). As children develop language, the meanings tied to words are socially situated based on their home experiences (Bruner, 1983; Gee, 2004).…”
Section: Literacy Developmentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Theoretical Framework Vygotsky (1986) postulates that a person's thought development is determined by language and the sociocultural experience of the individual as complementing tools since a slow accumulation of functions of the language mastered by the individual underpins the basic structures of thinking. Drawing on Vygotsky's sociocultural views on the role played by language and dialogue in knowledge construction, Halliday (1990) notes that "a child's acts of meaning are joint constructions, enacted through dialogue between himself" (p. 74) and others to achieve a personal identity. In other words, the use of language provides spaces to authenticate (Bucholtz, 2003) one's self "meaning-making and making sense of the world" (Makalela, 2015, p. 210).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%