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citations
Cited by 105 publications
(32 citation statements)
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References 43 publications
(70 reference statements)
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“…The minimal amount of aldosterone secreted in the presence of increased secretion of B and excretion of TH-18-OH compound A may also indicate a second biosynthetic defect either in the conversion of 18-OH-B to aldosterone because of lack of dehydrogenase activity or in the conversion of angular methyl group of B to an aldehyde. The secretory rates of B and DOC were far greater than rates observed after infusion of ACTH (10). Plasma levels of B were continually elevated and varied diurnally, and the pool size was much greater than normal.…”
Section: Miscellaneous Measurementsmentioning
confidence: 83%
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“…The minimal amount of aldosterone secreted in the presence of increased secretion of B and excretion of TH-18-OH compound A may also indicate a second biosynthetic defect either in the conversion of 18-OH-B to aldosterone because of lack of dehydrogenase activity or in the conversion of angular methyl group of B to an aldehyde. The secretory rates of B and DOC were far greater than rates observed after infusion of ACTH (10). Plasma levels of B were continually elevated and varied diurnally, and the pool size was much greater than normal.…”
Section: Miscellaneous Measurementsmentioning
confidence: 83%
“…Cortisol and corticosterone were measured by a double isotope dilution derivative technique (9). The half-life of corticosterone was determined after the intravenous administration of corticosterone-4-14C (10). Aldosterone was measured by the constant infusion (daldosterone-1-2-3H) technique of Tait, Tait, Little, and Laumas (11).…”
Section: Steroid Measurementsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…These values were similar to those of Lindner (1972) for the excretion of cortisol and its metabolites in sheep. Thus for both the natural hormone cortisol and its synthetic analogue the sheep can be placed between the rat on the one hand which shows a predominant faecal route of excretion (Rice et al 1974) and man on the other hand with mainly urinary excretion (Peterson and Pierce 1960).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, when the animal is fed on a low-protein diet, it may lead to insufficiency in the turnover of liver protein. Furthermore, the liver is the organ primarily responsible for the catabolism of the steroid hormone (19). It may be thought that changes in the liver function could either directly or indirectly influence the steroid hormone metabolism in the lens as reported previously (20), and finally it would bring about a reduction in the synthesis of cortisol-binding protein in the lens.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 80%