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Cited by 20 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 4 publications
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“…This could explain why not all patients with diabetes develop mood disorders. Moreover, in agreement with previous clinical and preclinical studies, our findings reinforce the idea that body weight gain, potentially leading to obesity, represents an important factor in the aetiology of MD (Licinio and Wong, ; Capuron et al ., ; Sharma and Fulton ; André et al ., ). Hence, the phenotype induced by prolonged HFD exposure could be due to changes in leptin action and not necessarily to glucose metabolism.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This could explain why not all patients with diabetes develop mood disorders. Moreover, in agreement with previous clinical and preclinical studies, our findings reinforce the idea that body weight gain, potentially leading to obesity, represents an important factor in the aetiology of MD (Licinio and Wong, ; Capuron et al ., ; Sharma and Fulton ; André et al ., ). Hence, the phenotype induced by prolonged HFD exposure could be due to changes in leptin action and not necessarily to glucose metabolism.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Owing to inactivity, distressed patients may experience weight gain and be more prone to develop obesity. Weight gain and obesity can also be side effects of psychotropic drugs prescribed for affective disorders [73]. Depressed patients who have been hospitalized for cardiovascular disease are also more likely to smoke [74], with smoking probably serving as an 'emotional painkiller'.…”
Section: Behavioral Mechanismsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[1][2][3] Surveys of phenomenology, comorbidity, family history, genetic traits, and pharmacologic treatment responses of mood disorders and the metabolic syndrome suggest that both types of condition may overlap and share striking similarities. [4][5][6] Little is known about the causal relationships and the initial sequence of events triggering and sustaining these complex and interrelated processes. In order to assess the contributions of environmental and lifestyle changes to these two outcomes, we studied a defined ethnic population following immigration with marked changes in social environment.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%