2018
DOI: 10.1159/000490615
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: The gut microbiota shows a wide inter-individual variation, but its within-individual variation is relatively stable over time. A functional core microbiome, provided by abundant bacterial taxa, seems to be common to various human hosts regardless of their gender, geographic location, and age. With advancing chronological age, the gut microbiota becomes more diverse and variable. However, when measures of biological age are used with adjustment for chronological age, overall richness decreases, while a certain… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

6
177
0
4

Year Published

2018
2018
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
8
1
1

Relationship

0
10

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 280 publications
(187 citation statements)
references
References 62 publications
6
177
0
4
Order By: Relevance
“…Although our results confirm that ASD was characterized by several changes in microbiota composition when compared with HCs, the results emphasized that this analysis is greatly influenced by several confounders, including the disease severity itself [10]. Our focus on de novo patients supports the hypothesis of a pathophysiological connection between ASD and gut microbiota, particularly with the reduced abundance of the Bacteroidales and Selenomonadales Class.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…Although our results confirm that ASD was characterized by several changes in microbiota composition when compared with HCs, the results emphasized that this analysis is greatly influenced by several confounders, including the disease severity itself [10]. Our focus on de novo patients supports the hypothesis of a pathophysiological connection between ASD and gut microbiota, particularly with the reduced abundance of the Bacteroidales and Selenomonadales Class.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…Based on 16S rDNA sequencing of the total gut microbiota, a relationship has been observed between clinical phenotypes in the elderly and an “aged microbiota” (Fransen et al, ). This microbiota is particularly enriched in pathobionts and displays a decreased abundance of bacteria with anti‐inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties (Fransen et al, ; García‐Peña, Álvarez‐Cisneros, Quiroz‐Baez, & Friedland, ; Kim & Jazwinski, ; Komanduri, Gondalia, Scholey, & Stough, ; Lu & Wang, ; Mangiola, Nicoletti, Gasbarrini, & Ponziani, ; Nagpal et al, ; Pasolli et al, ; Ramos‐Molina, Queipo‐Ortuño, Lambertos, Tinahones, & Peñafiel, ; Reveles, Patel, Forney, & Ross, ; Riaz Rajoka et al, ; Vaiserman, Koliada, & Marotta, ). These bacteria include the genera Bacteroides , Alistipes , Parabacteroides , Faecalibacterium , Ruminococcus , Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, Coprococcus , Roseburia , Coprobacillus , Anaerotruncus , Escherichia, Lactonifactor , Eubacterium , Lactobacillus , Bifidobacterium, and Akkermansia , and families such as Enterobacteriaceae, Eubacteriaceae , Porphyromonadaceae and Christensenellaceae .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Byerley et al [173] have described a serum profile that represents healthy aging, coupled with additional studies describing the concept of specific metabolic and genetic/epigenetic markers of biological age [174177], and linked with previous descriptions of telomere shortening [161] and genes controlling the aging process [178]. Interestingly, Kim and Jazwinski [179] provided a recent report suggesting that the characteristics of the gut microbiome contribute directly to healthy or unhealthy aging, albeit similar exploration of existing data has not been provided related to the oral microbiome effects on these processes. Thus, a number of studies have begun to focus on arrays of measures that could explain and/or predict biological aging and model the rate of senescence to predict mortality [160, 163, 165, 180].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%