1988
DOI: 10.1177/088636878802000303
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Abstract: To overcome the difficulties so often associated with merit pay programs, employers can make adjustments in such programs or combine them with other types of performance-based pay programs.

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Cited by 5 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…Under such a pay plan, an increase is added to an employee's base pay, the size of which depends on the rated performance of the employee. Numerous authors (for example, Heneman, 1990;Hills, Madigan, Scott, & Markham, 1987;Sullivan, 1988;Teel, 1986) have written about the shortcomings associated with merit pay plans: Employees do not see the link between their performance and their pay (because of the small differences in the amounts awarded for outstanding performance compared to average performance); employees view performance evaluations as biased (because they are based on subjective supervisor judgments); and employees have an inflated view of their own performance.…”
Section: Creative Compensation Programsmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Under such a pay plan, an increase is added to an employee's base pay, the size of which depends on the rated performance of the employee. Numerous authors (for example, Heneman, 1990;Hills, Madigan, Scott, & Markham, 1987;Sullivan, 1988;Teel, 1986) have written about the shortcomings associated with merit pay plans: Employees do not see the link between their performance and their pay (because of the small differences in the amounts awarded for outstanding performance compared to average performance); employees view performance evaluations as biased (because they are based on subjective supervisor judgments); and employees have an inflated view of their own performance.…”
Section: Creative Compensation Programsmentioning
confidence: 98%