2003
DOI: 10.1080/0165025024400047
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Abstract: Generative thinking is defined as the active construction of a creative instantiation of some familiar concept or object. Four studies examined differences in the generative thinking of 6-, 9-, and 12- year-olds. All versions of the task involved imagining where on the body they would place a third eye and why. In Study 1, when children and adults were required to draw their eye placement, only the adults considered novelty and utility, e.g., seeing all around with the eye behind the head. In Study 2, when chi… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 33 publications
(36 reference statements)
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“…Although a relation between imagination and EF was not present in older NT children and the NT group as a whole, better EF was associated with more imaginative house drawings in children with ASD and young NT children, which is consistent with previous research (e.g. Low et al, 2009;Low and Hollis, 2003;Thomas and Silk, 1990). Specifically, the fact that measures of EF (SOPT and ToH) we used in this study involve visuospatial planning and working memory suggests that these components play an important role in imagination (Booth et al, 2003;Leevers and Harris, 1998).…”
Section: Imagination and Efsupporting
confidence: 90%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Although a relation between imagination and EF was not present in older NT children and the NT group as a whole, better EF was associated with more imaginative house drawings in children with ASD and young NT children, which is consistent with previous research (e.g. Low et al, 2009;Low and Hollis, 2003;Thomas and Silk, 1990). Specifically, the fact that measures of EF (SOPT and ToH) we used in this study involve visuospatial planning and working memory suggests that these components play an important role in imagination (Booth et al, 2003;Leevers and Harris, 1998).…”
Section: Imagination and Efsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…According to this theory, EF is important in imaginative drawing because children must initially construct visuospatial representations of the drawing ideas they generate, maintain the representation in working memory, and monitor the unfolding drawing (Leevers and Harris, 1998;Low et al, 2009), suggesting important roles for planning and working memory in the course of this process. Indeed, in NT children, visuospatial planning is important for novel picture production (Low and Hollis, 2003;Thomas and Silk, 1990), and working memory is important in the manipulation of stereotypical drawing schemes (e.g. modifying the canonical representation of a human figure into a person in movement, see Morra, 2005).…”
Section: Imagination and Efmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…whether chimneys are in perpendicular orientation to the roof of a house), both of which have been found in young children's drawings to contain a great deal of error (e.g. Ibbotson & Bryant, 1976; Low & Hollis, 2003; Thomas & Tsalimi, 1988; Vasta & Liben, 1996).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Freeman, 1987;Low & Hollis, 2003;Thomas & Silk, 1990). shape contrast, axis orientation) is an important control factor that is involved in novel picture production (e.g.…”
Section: Imaginative Drawingsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…shape contrast, axis orientation) is an important control factor that is involved in novel picture production (e.g. Freeman, 1987;Low & Hollis, 2003;Thomas & Silk, 1990). CWA's success with imaginative picture completion tasks that have reduced planning demands also dovetails with research showing that such children have specific group deficits on measures of visuospatial planning (e.g.…”
Section: Imaginative Drawingsmentioning
confidence: 99%