2019
DOI: 10.1186/s12983-019-0340-y View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: BackgroundWhite-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a mycosis caused by a cutaneous infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). It produces hibernation mortality rates of 75–98% in 4 bats: Myotis lucifugus, M. septentrionalis, M. sodalis, and Perimyotis subflavus. These high mortality rates were observed during the first several years after the arrival of P. destructans at a hibernation site. Mortality is caused by a 60% decrease in torpor bout duration, which results in a premature depletion of depot fat … Show more

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“…Despite these differences, recovery occurred on a similar time scale as for freeranging bats in the wild and, in our view, these results are useful for understanding the recovery process from WNS. WNS is usually considered a disease of hibernation but our study highlights that population viability will depend not just on energetics of hibernation (Frank et al, 2019), but also energy balance during healing. Although there are few examples of wildlife disease as a driver of seasonal carryover effects, carryover (Norris, 2005;O'Connor et al, 2014) is thought to play a role in the impacts of WNS (Davy et al, 2017).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…Despite these differences, recovery occurred on a similar time scale as for freeranging bats in the wild and, in our view, these results are useful for understanding the recovery process from WNS. WNS is usually considered a disease of hibernation but our study highlights that population viability will depend not just on energetics of hibernation (Frank et al, 2019), but also energy balance during healing. Although there are few examples of wildlife disease as a driver of seasonal carryover effects, carryover (Norris, 2005;O'Connor et al, 2014) is thought to play a role in the impacts of WNS (Davy et al, 2017).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Pseudogymnoascus destructans, a fungal pathogen first recognized in Northern American bat caves in 2006, has caused a significant depletion of select bat populations [11]. Experimental treatments and vaccines are being studied to limit the spread and mortality of bats due to WNS, yet none have found widespread application [5].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…White-nose syndrome, a recently identified disease caused by Pd , has devastated North American bat populations [ 9 – 11 ]. Pseudogymnoascus destructans is a psychrophilic filamentous fungus [ 12 14 ], with an optimal growth range of 12.5–15.8°C [ 15 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Models parameterized with long-term data on fungal loads, infection intensity and counts of M. lucifugus at hibernacula have suggested development of either tolerance or resistance in these persisting populations (Frick et al 2017). This is supported by reports of infected individuals not arousing from torpor as frequently as during the acute phase of the zoonosis (Lilley et al 2016;Frank et al 2019). Because WNS has resulted in massive population declines in some M. lucifugus, there is a possibility that selection could occur for alleles conferring resistance or tolerance within the standing genetic variation.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning