volume 43, issue 3, P415-434 1995
DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-954x.1995.tb00609.x
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Abstract: Abstract Peter Mayle's best‐selling accounts of his life in Provence have appealed to a wide audience in Britain but have also attracted harsh criticism. It is argued here that these works, although ostensibly about Provence, are better analysed as myths for the English. The contrast with an account from the 1930s reflects wider social change, showing a move from a confidently colonial to a self‐consciously ‘anthropological’ mode. Doubts about the authenticity of Mayle's accounts are related both to his use o…

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