2002
DOI: 10.1080/03932720208456997
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The electoral victory of reformist Islamists in secular Turkey

Abstract: Close to two dozen political parties ran in the elections. Five major parties with long experience and strong nationwide organisations had served in the outgoing parliament since 1999: The Democratic Left Party (DSP) of Bulent Ecevit, the National Action Party (MHP) of Devlet Bahceli and the Motherland Party (ANAP) of Mesud Yilmaz governed in coalition. The True Path Party (DYP) of Tansu Ciller and the Felicity Party (SP) of Recai Kutan were the major parliamentary opposition. All five were defeated.The SP was… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…Even though some efforts have been made to interpret the rise of one particular party such as the Turkish Welfare Party (Onis 1997;Akinci 1999;Gülalp 2001), Turkish Justice and Development Party (Sezer 2002), Egyptian Freedom and Justice Party (Farag 2012;Elsayyad and Hanafy 2013), Algerian FIS (Chhibber 1996), etc., there is a lack of comprehensive theoretical frameworks which could be generalized to more cases. Among the descriptive scholarships that focus on specific parties, one common perspective is that socio-economic grievances drive Islamic political parties to popularity while lack of grievance hinders their growth (Gülalp 2001;Layachi 2000;Garcia-Rivero and Kotzé 2007;Chhibber 1996).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Even though some efforts have been made to interpret the rise of one particular party such as the Turkish Welfare Party (Onis 1997;Akinci 1999;Gülalp 2001), Turkish Justice and Development Party (Sezer 2002), Egyptian Freedom and Justice Party (Farag 2012;Elsayyad and Hanafy 2013), Algerian FIS (Chhibber 1996), etc., there is a lack of comprehensive theoretical frameworks which could be generalized to more cases. Among the descriptive scholarships that focus on specific parties, one common perspective is that socio-economic grievances drive Islamic political parties to popularity while lack of grievance hinders their growth (Gülalp 2001;Layachi 2000;Garcia-Rivero and Kotzé 2007;Chhibber 1996).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%