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Cited by 11 publications
(14 citation statements)
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References 15 publications
(14 reference statements)
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“…In Experiment 2, propranolol 80 mg induced a significant increase in salivary corticosteroid levels, representing the free portion of the steroid that easily crosses the blood-brain barrier. This finding, also observed in previous animal (Lewis, Groom, Barber, & Henderson, 1981) and human (Kizildere, Glück, Zietz, Schölmerich, & Straub, 2003) studies, raises the intriguing possibility that the impairing effects of propranolol 80 mg on short- and long-term declarative memory may be due, at least in part, to propranolol-induced increases in corticosteroid levels.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 82%
“…In Experiment 2, propranolol 80 mg induced a significant increase in salivary corticosteroid levels, representing the free portion of the steroid that easily crosses the blood-brain barrier. This finding, also observed in previous animal (Lewis, Groom, Barber, & Henderson, 1981) and human (Kizildere, Glück, Zietz, Schölmerich, & Straub, 2003) studies, raises the intriguing possibility that the impairing effects of propranolol 80 mg on short- and long-term declarative memory may be due, at least in part, to propranolol-induced increases in corticosteroid levels.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 82%
“…The rise of cortisol and PRL that occurs in response to insulin hypoglycaemia in normal subjects has been shown to be unchanged by metoprolol, propranolol or alprenolol (Nilsson et al, 1980;Ostman et al, 1982). Lewis et al (1981) (1980) showed that very high doses of propranolol increased PRL. In man a reduction in overnight PRL was demonstrated following propranolol 80 mg twice daily given to healthy male volunteers for 6 weeks (Dart et al, 1981).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The dose of antipsychotic medication was transformed to a chlorpromazine equivalent (mg) according to the defined daily dose of antipsychotics, which were extracted from the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification Index by the World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Drug Statistics Methodology. 28 The subjects were also receiving other concomitant psychotropic medications such as lithium, valproate, benzodiazepine, anticholinergics, and propranolol, which are known to directly and/or indirectly affect serum testosterone level [29][30][31][32][33] and symptoms of schizophrenia. In the placebo group, 3 subjects (20%) compared with 6 subjects (40%) received lithium in the testosterone group; 3 (20%) compared with 2 (13.3%) received valproate; 4 (26.7%) compared with 7 (46.7%) received benzodiazepine; and 3 (20%) compared with 1 (6.7%) received propranolol.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The ethnicity and the short duration also limit the conclusions we are able to draw. There are many factors that affect the serum testosterone levels in men or male schizophrenics, such as psychotropic medications, 26,[29][30][31][32][33] aging, 62 body mass index, 63 stress, 64 diet, 65 exercise, 66 and sexual activity. 67 Although the authors tried to control these confounding factors, they may have influenced the serum levels of testosterone and may have affected the relationship between the serum levels and the symptoms.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%