2020
DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsaa289 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Study objectives New theory and measurement approaches have facilitated nuanced investigation of how sleep loss impacts dimensions of affective functioning. To provide a quantitative summary of this literature, three conceptually related meta-analyses examined the effect of sleep restriction and sleep deprivation on mood, emotion, and emotion regulation across the lifespan (i.e., from early childhood to late adulthood). Method … Show more

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“…Critically, in contrast to past work [ 33 , 36 , 42 ], we found that sleep deprived individuals do not differ significantly from their rested counterparts in attending to, identifying, updating, and maintaining affective information, indicating that bottom-up flow of affective information is not affected by TSD and that the TSD effects we do observe are likely the result of non-specific deficits unrelated to affective processing. However, our results are in agreement with previous observations that individuals under TSD have greater difficulty engaging in controlled emotion regulation processes when there is a goal to do so [ 21 ]. This impairment does not appear to be due to any systematic change in how affective information is processed, but is likely due to TSD effects on higher order control processes that are responsible for goal-directed regulation of emotion rather than a specific deficit in affective processing.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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“…Critically, in contrast to past work [ 33 , 36 , 42 ], we found that sleep deprived individuals do not differ significantly from their rested counterparts in attending to, identifying, updating, and maintaining affective information, indicating that bottom-up flow of affective information is not affected by TSD and that the TSD effects we do observe are likely the result of non-specific deficits unrelated to affective processing. However, our results are in agreement with previous observations that individuals under TSD have greater difficulty engaging in controlled emotion regulation processes when there is a goal to do so [ 21 ]. This impairment does not appear to be due to any systematic change in how affective information is processed, but is likely due to TSD effects on higher order control processes that are responsible for goal-directed regulation of emotion rather than a specific deficit in affective processing.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…Using a commonly accepted emotion regulation task, we obtained results that are consistent with previous work documenting disruptions to the effectiveness of emotion regulation under conditions of sleep loss [ 21 ]. During the decrease/negative trials of this task, sleep deprived individuals had more difficulty actively regulating emotional responses to negative stimuli when instructed to do so.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
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