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Cited by 13 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 13 publications
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“…Thus, the accumulation of body fat reserves by the trout fed on the high-fat diet during phase 1 of the experiment did not seem to have any depressive effect upon rates of body weight gain. This result seems to differ from the findings of studies carried out on a number of mammalian species, in which the accumulation of large reserves of body fat can lead to both a suppression of appetite and a reduction in weight gain (Drewry, Harris & Martin 1989;Weigle 1994); however, body fat accumulation may need to be extreme before such suppressive effects on appetite and growth are observed. It is unlikely that body fat deposition by the trout fed the highfat diet during phase 1 was excessive because these fish maintained their body fat concentration at µ 15% during phase 2 when they were given a choice between diets differing in fat content (Table 1; Fig.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 96%
“…Thus, the accumulation of body fat reserves by the trout fed on the high-fat diet during phase 1 of the experiment did not seem to have any depressive effect upon rates of body weight gain. This result seems to differ from the findings of studies carried out on a number of mammalian species, in which the accumulation of large reserves of body fat can lead to both a suppression of appetite and a reduction in weight gain (Drewry, Harris & Martin 1989;Weigle 1994); however, body fat accumulation may need to be extreme before such suppressive effects on appetite and growth are observed. It is unlikely that body fat deposition by the trout fed the highfat diet during phase 1 was excessive because these fish maintained their body fat concentration at µ 15% during phase 2 when they were given a choice between diets differing in fat content (Table 1; Fig.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
confidence: 96%
“…Return to normal chow consumption occurred only after loss of excess body fat. Similar results were obtained by Harris and co-workers (15)(16)(17) in a series of studies involving both mature and juvenile rats. These workers tube fed experimental animals a daily caloric intake ranging from 40% to 200% of the intake of ad libitum fed control animals to produce well-documented decreases or increases in total body fat content.…”
Section: Studies Of Recovery From Induced Weight Changesupporting
confidence: 88%
“…The adipose tissue represents the largest energy reserve of the body, and adipocytes maintain stores of fat that are replenished in times of plenty and mobilized in times of nutritional deficit (Kennedy 1953; van Itallie & Kissileff 1985; Weigle 1994). Mammals seem to have the ability to maintain body adiposity within relatively narrow limits, resulting in a long‐term adipose homeostasis (Harris, Kasser & Martin 1986; Drewry, Harris & Martin 1989; Kaiyala, Woods & Schwartz 1995; Inui 1999; Loftus 1999; Schwartz, Woods, Porte, Seeley & Baskin 2000). This represents a balance between energy intake, regulated by feeding, and energy expenditure, which may involve modulation of metabolic rate (Friedman & Ramirez 1985; Weigle 1994; Kaiyala et al .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%