1994
DOI: 10.1177/0013164494054001002 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: Many testing programs rely on equating procedures to achieve comparability of scores on alternate test forms. One commonly accepted rule for developing equated examinations using the common-items nonequivalent groups (CINEG) design is that items common to the two examinations being equated should be identical. In test construction practice, this rule has been extended to include even the order in which options appear in the two examinations. The present study examined the performance of a common set of items o… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
1
1
1
1
1
17
0

Year Published

1999
1999
2012
2012

Publication Types

Select...
3
2

Relationship

0
5

Authors

Journals

1
17
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Several studies suggest that slight changes in the appearance of an item can affect performance on that item. Something as simple as changing the font in which a question is written, the order items are presented, or the order of response options can affect performance on that item (Beaton & Zwick, 1990;Cizek, 1991). Other studies have shown that people become more fatigued when reading text on a computer screen than when they read the same text on paper (Mourant, Lakshmanan & Chantadisai, 1981).…”
Section: Converting Paper Versions To Computer Versionsmentioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 100,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…Several studies suggest that slight changes in the appearance of an item can affect performance on that item. Something as simple as changing the font in which a question is written, the order items are presented, or the order of response options can affect performance on that item (Beaton & Zwick, 1990;Cizek, 1991). Other studies have shown that people become more fatigued when reading text on a computer screen than when they read the same text on paper (Mourant, Lakshmanan & Chantadisai, 1981).…”
Section: Converting Paper Versions To Computer Versionsmentioning
“…One study investigated the effect of altering the correct response position of MCQs. It found that item performance was inversely affected by changes in correct option placement (22). On the other hand, other studies found no remarkable differences between edited and unedited items (23,24).…”
mentioning
“…The longer the anchor test, the more reliable the equating will be (Budescu, 1985). Additional precautions to avoid systematic influences on anchor items relate to their positioning, which should be approximately the same in the alternate forms (Cook & Petersen, 1987), and their presentation, which should be identical, i.e., without changing the text (Cassels & Johnstone, 1984) or the order of multiple-choice options (Cizek, 1994 pass/fail cut-score, the majority of the misclassifications were within the 95% confidence band of the cut-score, "indicating that the misclassifications may be due purely to error of measurement and not to the effect of drift" (p.8). Wells, Subkoviak, and Serlin (2002) applied a 2PL IRT model, and in addition they examined what the effect was on ability estimates when drifted items were excluded from equating; they found little effect.…”
Section: Desirable Characteristics Of the Common Itemsmentioning