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“…or Jurinea pinnata DC., [124,130], which are present in serpentine and gypsum, respectively. It seems possible that parallel adaptative mechanisms (in addition to tolerance to environmental stress) work on these three types of substrate [26,131]. As in Cecchi et al [37], we believe that the Bornmuellera clade, in particular the genus Hormathophylla , is an ideal system to perform experimental comparative research on their ability to thrive in metal accumulation conditions and the tolerance to magnesium in plants.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…or Jurinea pinnata DC., [124,130], which are present in serpentine and gypsum, respectively. It seems possible that parallel adaptative mechanisms (in addition to tolerance to environmental stress) work on these three types of substrate [26,131]. As in Cecchi et al [37], we believe that the Bornmuellera clade, in particular the genus Hormathophylla , is an ideal system to perform experimental comparative research on their ability to thrive in metal accumulation conditions and the tolerance to magnesium in plants.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Whereas serpentinophytes have been thoroughly studied in Alysseae, in which some of the species have evolved to become heavy-metal hyperaccumulators [11,2829], little is known about the evolution of species on alkaline soils. The combined presence of high levels of Mg [3031] and a low proportion of Ca/Mg are the common conditions defining these alkaline habitats, a feature also present in serpentines [2526]. In addition to soil chemical composition, another factor influencing plant adaptation to this potentially toxic substrate is their parallel occurrence in highly xeric environments, like steppes or rocky habitats [32].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…In our experiment, plants were regularly fertilized, so that nutritional deficiencies were unlikely. Toxicity as a result of an excess of Mg, or Mg/Ca imbalance caused by the presence of dolostone (Mota et al, 2017), cannot be ruled out as a factor contributing to reduced growth of D plants, but this is also unlikely based on similar biomass and productivity observed at natural sites with B vs D bedrock (see later). Interestingly, D plants reduced leaf but not root or stem biomass, leading to an adjustment of root-to-shoot ratio, a typical response of plants to limited soil water availability (Li et al, 2005).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Despite their geographical amplitude and geomorphological and climatic heterogeneity, there are a number of features that are common to all descriptions of the vegetation associated with dolomite. These traits can assist in delimiting the dolomite phenomenon (dolomitophily or dolomite edaphism, sensu Mota, and colleagues [ 17 , 18 ]). There are patches of exposed dolomite (or dolomitic marble or dolomitic limestone) bedrock, associated with thin and undeveloped soils, on which they become frequently disaggregated rock fragments providing a gravelly or even sandy appearance to their surface [ 19 , 20 , 21 ].…”
Section: Definition Of the Dolomite Phenomenonmentioning
“…As already noted, this relationship is considered key to understanding the link between plants and some types of rock. Mota and colleagues [ 18 ] have suggested that the relationship between both elements in plant tissues may serve to approximate a geoecological theory or, at least, to explain not only the edaphism of serpentine, but also that of dolomite and gypsum. These edaphisms can be ordered in a series ranging from lowest to highest Ca:Mg ratio, in serpentine (ultramafic rocks), dolostone, limestone, and gypsum; this gradient can also be recognized on the ground ( Table 1 ).…”
Section: Dolomitophily and Other Ca:mg Edaphismsmentioning